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North Korea

North Korea Threatens "Merciless Nuclear Attack"

KOREA TIMES, YONHAP(South Korea), KCNA, (North Korea), AP, U.S. Military (USA)

Worldcrunch

SEOUL – Thousands of North Korean students and soldiers turned out for a rally in Pyongyang on Friday to support their leader’s call to arms, adding fuel to rising nuclear-charged tensions with South Korea and the United States, reports the AP.

The protesters chanted “Death to the U.S. imperialists,” and “Sweep away the U.S. aggressors.”

Earlier on Friday, North Korean state media reported that Kim Jong-un had ordered the country’s strategic rocket forces to be placed on standby to strike U.S. and South Korean targets, reports the South Korean Yonhap news agency.

The Korean Central News Agency in Pyongyang said in a dispatch, "(Kim) convened an urgent operation meeting on the Korean People's Army's Strategic Rocket Force's performance of duty for firepower strike at the Supreme Command , ordering them to be on standby to fire so that they may strike any time the U.S. mainland, its military bases in the operational theaters in the Pacific, including Hawaii and Guam, and those in South Korea.”

According to Seoul-based Korea Times, Kim Jung-un’s move comes as retaliation for the operational drills conducted this week by two U.S. B-2 stealth bombers over the Korean Peninsula.

The U.S. military said in a statement that the drill, part of joint operations with South Korea, was to demonstrate its “capability to defend the Republic of Korea,” and its “ability to conduct long range precision strikes quickly and at will.”

The Korean Central News Agency said that Kim viewed the B-2 drills as an “ultimatum” that Washington would ignite a nuclear war at any cost: "Kim declared the revolutionary armed forces of (North Korea) would react to the U.S. nuclear blackmail with merciless nuclear attack, and war of aggression with an all-out war of justice (of its own)," said the agency.

Tensions have risen on the peninsula since North Korea conducted its third nuclear test last month, reports Yonhap, sparking a new round of UN-led sanctions.

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Map Johannes Barre/Patrick Mannion

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Society

"Splendid" Colonialism? Time To Change How We Talk About Fashion And Culture

A lavish book to celebrate Cartagena, Colombia's most prized travel destination, will perpetuate clichéd views of a city inextricably linked with European exploitation.

Photo of women in traditional clothes at a market in Cartagena, Colombia

At a market iIn Cartagena, Colombia

Vanessa Rosales

-Analysis-

BOGOTÁ — The Colombian designer Johanna Ortiz is celebrating the historic port of Cartagena de Indias, in Colombia, in a new book, Cartagena Grace, published by Assouline. The European publisher specializes in luxury art and travel books, or those weighty, costly coffee table books filled with dreamy pictures. If you never opened the book, you could still admire it as a beautiful object in a lobby or on a center table.

Ortiz produced the book in collaboration with Lauren Santo Domingo, an American model (née Davis, in Connecticut) who married into one of Colombia's wealthiest families. Assouline is promoting it as a celebration of the city's "colonial splendor, Caribbean soul and unfaltering pride," while the Bogotá weekly Semana has welcomed an international publisher's focus on one of the country's emblematic cities and tourist spots.

And yet, use of terms like colonial "splendor" is not just inappropriate, but unacceptable.

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