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THE HANKYOREH, KCNA (North Korea), CNN (USA)

Worldcrunch

SEOUL – Rumors are spreading fast that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s wife, Ri Sol Ju, is pregnant.

North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) published a picture of her wearing a long coat that could be hiding an imperial baby bump. Ri Sol Ju was pictured with her husband at a soccer match and music performance in Pyongyang – her first public appearance in more than 50 days.

Wait a minute…did Ri Sol-Ju just pull a Houdini? bit.ly/XQQpKJ via @hermionekitson#tenlate

— Ten Late News (@TenLateNews) October 30, 2012

This is how the state-run news agency reported it: "Marshall Kim Jong-un, the supreme leader of the party and the people, came to the spectators' seats, accompanied by his wife Ri Sol-ju. At that moment, thunderous applause broke out."

[rebelmouse-image 27085966 alt="""" original_size="320x238" expand=1]

What do you see? (source Wikimedia)

In the two photographs that were released, she is seen wearing a long beige overcoat, an outfit commonly worn by pregnant women in cold weather, North Korea’s The Hankyoreh writes.

Is Mrs. Kim Jong Un pregnant? Compare Aug. 30 & Oct. 29 photos from KCNA in #DPRK: twitter.com/W7VOA/status/2…

— Steve Herman (@W7VOA) October 30, 2012

Speculation started -- especially in South Korean media -- as to whether North Korea’s first lady is pregnant or whether she was kept out of the public eye as a disciplinary measure for a perceived slight. Local media has claimed she may have fallen out of favor for not wearing a lapel pin of the former leaders, according to CNN.

North Korea’s leader, by announcing Ri Sol Ju as his wife and having her accompany him on many public engagements, has shown a far more open public personality than his late father, Kim Jong Il.

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