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Nigeria

Nigerian Newspaper: Plane That Crashed Wasn't Authorized To Fly

LEADERSHIP/THE NIGERIAN TRIBUNE (Nigeria)

LAGOS - Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan has declared three days of mourning following Sunday's plane crash. The Dana Airline plane crashed in a densely populated district of Lagos on Sunday afternoon, killing all 153 passengers. Only 60 bodies have been recovered so far. The number of victims on the ground is still uncertain, according to the Nigerian Tribune. The huge fire resulting from the crash slowed down the rescuers, who were only able to intervene three hours after the accident.

The Nigerian airline's Boeing MD-83 crashed minutes before it was scheduled to land at Murtala Muhammed International Airport. The daily Nigerian newspaper Leadership reveals that the plane had been under repair these past weeks and shouldn't have been authorized to fly. "The Dana aircraft is said to have narrowly escaped a crash in the last couple of weeks before yesterday's fatal accident," reports the newspaper.

The cause of the accident is still unknown but it seems that the two motors stopped working simultaneously. The pilot sent a distress call just before the crash to say that the engine had failed.

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Geopolitics

How Ukraine Keeps Getting The West To Flip On Arms Supplies

The open debate on weapon deliveries to Ukraine is highly unusual, but Kyiv has figured out how to use the public moral suasion — and patience — to repeatedly shift the question in its favor. But will it work now for fighter jets?

Photo of a sunset over the USS Nimitz with a man guiding fighter jets ready for takeoff

U.S fighter jets ready for takeoff on the USS Nimitz

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — In what other war have arms deliveries been negotiated so openly in the public sphere?

On Monday, a journalist asked Joe Biden if he plans on supplying F-16 fighter jets to Ukraine. He answered “No”. A few hours later, the same question was asked to Emmanuel Macron, about French fighter jets. Macron did not rule it out.

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Visiting Paris on Tuesday, Ukrainian Defense Minister Oleksïï Reznikov recalled that a year ago, the United States had refused him ground-air Stinger missiles deliveries. Eleven months later, Washington is delivering heavy tanks, in addition to everything else. The 'no' of yesterday is the green light of tomorrow: this is the lesson that the very pragmatic minister seemed to learn.

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