BBC, AFP

Worldcrunch

THE HAGUE – The Dutch state has been held responsible by the Supreme Court of the Netherlands for the deaths of three Bosnian Muslim men killed in the infamous 1995 massacre in Srebrenica.

The men had been ordered to leave a UN compound run by Dutch peacekeeping forces when Bosnian Serb forces overran it, reports the BBC.

The three Bosniaks (Bosnian Muslims) were working for the Dutch force during the 1992-1995 Bosnian war and were among thousands who found refuge in the UN compound as Bosnian Serb forces overran Srebrenica on July 11, 1995. Two days later, the UN forced the Bosniaks out of the compound, and they were subsequently killed.

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General Radko Mladic commanded the troops during the Srebrenica genocide. He apeared in court at the International Criminal Tribunal Court in La Hague in June 2011. Photo: Tv - Xinhua/ZUMA

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People gathering at Potocari Memorial Center in Srebrenica to mourn for victims of the massacre. Photo: Haris Memija - Xinhua/ZUMA

According to the AFP, the final ruling in this long-running case means that relatives of the victims can seek compensation from the Dutch state. The Srebrenica massacre is considered to be Europe’s worst massacre since World War II, with some 8,000 Bosnian Muslims slaughtered.

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