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Geopolitics

Multiple Earthquakes Hit Southwest China, At Least 24 Dead

CHINA DAILY, XINHUA (China), BBC NEWS (UK)

Worldcrunch

BEIJING – A series of earthquakes in southwestern China on Friday killed at least 24 people and injured 150 more, reports BBC News.

Chinese state media Xinhua said the 5.7 magnitude quake struck the border of Yunnan and Guizhou provinces, with its epicenter located in the Yiliang county of Yunnan.

The quake, which was also felt in neighboring Sichuan Province, was followed by several tremors. Two other earthquakes, respectively measured at 5.6 and 3.2 magnitude, shook the border area.

Xinhua has reported that some houses collapsed and power went off in neighboring towns. More than 20,000 houses are believed to be damaged while more than 100,000 people have been evacuated in Yunnan, adds Xinhua.

Southwestern China is often hit by earthquakes. In May 2008, a magnitude 7.9 quake in Sichuan killed at least 69,000 people.

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Ideas

"Collateral Benefit": Could Putin's Launching A Failed War Make The World Better?

Consider the inverse of "collateral damage." Envision Russia's defeat and the triumph of a democratic coalition offers reflection on the most weighty sense of costs and benefits.

Photo of a doll representing Russian President Vladimir Putin

Demonstrators holding a doll with a picture of Russian President Putin

Dominique Moïsi

-Analysis-

PARIS — The concept of collateral damage has developed in the course of so-called "asymmetrical” wars, fought between opponents considered unequal.

The U.S. drone which targeted rebel fighters in Afghanistan, and annihilated an entire family gathered for a wedding, appears to be the perfect example of collateral damage: a doubtful military gain, and a certain political cost. One might also consider the American bombing of Normandy towns around June 6, 1944 as collateral damage.

But is it possible to reverse the expression, and speak of "collateral benefits"? When applied to an armed conflict, the expression may seem shocking.

No one benefits from a war, which leaves in its trace a trail of dead, wounded and displaced people, destroyed cities or children brutally torn from their parents.

And yet the notion of "collateral benefits" is particularly applicable to the war that has been raging in Ukraine for almost a year.

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