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Geopolitics

“Lady Disastro”: 25 International And UK Front Pages As Liz Truss Resigns In Record Time

Calling it quits after just 44 days in office, Liz Truss now has the dubious honor of being Britain’s shortest-serving prime minister.

photography of a TV broadcast showing UK Prime Minister Liz Truss giving her resignation speech

'"I cannot deliver the mandate on which I was elected by the Conservative Party."

Bertrand Hauger

Prime Minister Liz Truss’s extra short reign is likely to go down as a (double) footnote in the history books — easily forgotten after a record-setting reign of only 44 days, though squeezing in the honor of being prime minister during the passage of the crown from Queen Elizabeth to King Charles.

But for at least one (more) day, at least, Truss was a front-page sensation Friday both on UK newspapers and tabloids mocking “the worst PM we’ve ever had” and the rest of the world looking on at the sad state of British politics.

Here is our selection of front pages, from London and beyond:


UK - The Guardian

UK - The i

UK - Belfast Telegraph

UK - The Journal

UK - Metro

UK - The Mirror

UK - The Sun

UK - Daily Express

UK - Daily Star

US - The Washington Post

Germany - Süddeutsche Zeitung

Belgium - De Morgen

Denmark - Politiken

Spain - La Vanguardia

Spain - ara

France - Le Monde

France - Ouest France

Italy - La Stampa

Portugal - Público

Turkey - Olay

Brazil - O Estado de São Paulo

Chile - La Segunda

India - The Times of India

South Korea - JoongAng Ilbo

Japan - The Japan Times

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Economy

How Fleeing Russians (And Their Rubles) Are Shaking Up Neighboring Economies

Russians fled the war to neighboring countries, bringing with them billions of dollars worth of wealth. The influx of money is both a windfall and a problem.

How Fleeing Russians (And Their Rubles) Are Shaking Up Neighboring Economies

January 2023, Saint Petersburg, Russia. Sberbank logo seen on a residential building during the sanctions against Russian banks

Maksim Konstantinov / SOPA Images via ZUMA Press Wire
Important Stories

Posting a comment on a Kazakhstani real estate listing and sales website this past fall, one user couldn't contain his enthusiasm: "It's unbelievable, hasn't happened since 2013 — the market has exploded! ... Yippee! I don't know who to kiss!"

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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The boom of demand — and dollars — in Kazakhstan, and other countries in the region, is traced directly to the incoming Russians and their wealth who have arrived since the war in Ukraine began.

The ongoing wave of fleeing Russians is likely the largest emigration from the country in 100 years. There are no accurate estimates of how many Russians have left the country, much less where they will settle or how many of them will eventually return home. But between March and October, up to 1.5 million people left Russia. A conservative estimate suggests half a million haven't returned.

The main flow passed through Georgia, Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan (which has the longest land border with Russia). In these countries, the Russian language is widespread and visas are unnecessary. Russians can even enter Kazakhstan and Armenia without a passport.

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