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Geopolitics

“Lady Disastro”: 25 International And UK Front Pages As Liz Truss Resigns In Record Time

Calling it quits after just 44 days in office, Liz Truss now has the dubious honor of being Britain’s shortest-serving prime minister.

photography of a TV broadcast showing UK Prime Minister Liz Truss giving her resignation speech

'"I cannot deliver the mandate on which I was elected by the Conservative Party."

Bertrand Hauger

Prime Minister Liz Truss’s extra short reign is likely to go down as a (double) footnote in the history books — easily forgotten after a record-setting reign of only 44 days, though squeezing in the honor of being prime minister during the passage of the crown from Queen Elizabeth to King Charles.

But for at least one (more) day, at least, Truss was a front-page sensation Friday both on UK newspapers and tabloids mocking “the worst PM we’ve ever had” and the rest of the world looking on at the sad state of British politics.

Here is our selection of front pages, from London and beyond:


UK - The Guardian

UK - The i

UK - Belfast Telegraph

UK - The Journal

UK - Metro

UK - The Mirror

UK - The Sun

UK - Daily Express

UK - Daily Star

US - The Washington Post

Germany - Süddeutsche Zeitung

Belgium - De Morgen

Denmark - Politiken

Spain - La Vanguardia

Spain - ara

France - Le Monde

France - Ouest France

Italy - La Stampa

Portugal - Público

Turkey - Olay

Brazil - O Estado de São Paulo

Chile - La Segunda

India - The Times of India

South Korea - JoongAng Ilbo

Japan - The Japan Times

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Society

The Everyday Weight Of Wearing A Hijab In India

Several Muslim women who wear hijabs share their stories to highlight the discrimination, from disapproving looks to outright insults, they face everyday in India in both their personal and professional lives.

photo of women wearing hijabs during the Muharram procession in Srinagar, India

During the Muharram procession in Srinagar, India

Idrees Abbas/SOPA Images via ZUMA
Seemi Pasha

On September 20, 2022, the government of Karnataka told the Supreme Court that Muslims girls in Udupi were goaded into wearing a hijab to school by the Islamic Popular Front of India (PFI) through social media messages. The state government made the argument while responding to a petition challenging the ban on wearing a hijab to school imposed by Karnataka, and upheld by the state high court. Solicitor General Tushar Mehta told the apex court that wearing a hijab was part of a "larger conspiracy" orchestrated by the PFI to create social unrest.

On October 13 this year, the Supreme Court of India delivered a split verdict on pleas challenging the Karnataka high court order that had upheld the ban. A constitutional bench comprising the Chief Justice of India will now examine whether Muslim girls can or cannot wear a head scarf in school.

As of December 1 this year, there were 69,598 cases pending before the Supreme Court. The backlog includes petitions challenging the Modi government’s Citizenship (Amendment) Act 2019 and pleas challenging the government’s decision to dilute Article 370 of the Constitution. These have been pending for more than two years. Despite the urgency of matters that have been placed on the back burner, the apex court is being forced to spend its time deciding whether schoolgoing Muslim girls can get an education while wearing a head scarf, a tradition some Muslims believe is integral their faith.

The ban on wearing a hijab in classrooms may have highlighted the Karnataka government’s intolerance towards minorities, but the bias against the head scarf, it seems, is an old one.

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