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BOSTON MAGAZINE, ROLLING STONE

Worldcrunch

BOSTON - In an angry response to this week's controversial Rolling Stone cover of alleged Boston bomber Dzokhar Tsarnaev, a police photographer has given pictures of the dramatic capture to Boston Magazine to publish on its website.

Massachusetts State Police Seargent Sean Murphy leaked the photos he took of the manhunt and eventual capture of Tsarnaev in a bid to show “the real face of terrorism, not the handsome, confident young man” portrayed on the Rolling Stone cover, the Boston Magazine writes.

Murphy saw the Rolling Stone cover as an insult to the victims, and dangerous in glorifying an alleged terrorist. “This guy is evil. This is the real Boston bomber,” Murphy wrote.

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The unauthorized images published by the Boston Magazine show every step of the manhunt, (see photos here) including a picture of the bloodied teenager with the red dot of a laser sight of a sniper rifle on his face after he was eventually found hiding in a boat.

Rolling Stones has justified its editorial choice emphasizing its “thoughtfull coverage” of Tsarnaev’s personality.

Murphy, a 25-year law enforcement veteran, will reportedly face an enquiry into his releasing the photos to the public. He argued that the magazine cover could be an "incentive to those who may be unstable to do something to get their face on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine.” Some convenience stores said they will not stock this issue.

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