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Leaked Photos Of Tsarnaev Capture Follow Controversial Rolling Stone Cover

BOSTON MAGAZINE, ROLLING STONE

Worldcrunch

BOSTON - In an angry response to this week's controversial Rolling Stone cover of alleged Boston bomber Dzokhar Tsarnaev, a police photographer has given pictures of the dramatic capture to Boston Magazine to publish on its website.

Massachusetts State Police Seargent Sean Murphy leaked the photos he took of the manhunt and eventual capture of Tsarnaev in a bid to show “the real face of terrorism, not the handsome, confident young man” portrayed on the Rolling Stone cover, the Boston Magazine writes.

Murphy saw the Rolling Stone cover as an insult to the victims, and dangerous in glorifying an alleged terrorist. “This guy is evil. This is the real Boston bomber,” Murphy wrote.

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The unauthorized images published by the Boston Magazine show every step of the manhunt, (see photos here) including a picture of the bloodied teenager with the red dot of a laser sight of a sniper rifle on his face after he was eventually found hiding in a boat.

Rolling Stones has justified its editorial choice emphasizing its “thoughtfull coverage” of Tsarnaev’s personality.

Murphy, a 25-year law enforcement veteran, will reportedly face an enquiry into his releasing the photos to the public. He argued that the magazine cover could be an "incentive to those who may be unstable to do something to get their face on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine.” Some convenience stores said they will not stock this issue.

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Green Or Gone

Tracking The Asian Fishing "Armada" That Sucks Up Tons Of Seafood Off Argentina's Coast

A brightly-lit flotilla of fishing ships has reappeared in international waters off the southern coast of Argentina as it has annually in recent years for an "industrial harvest" of thousands of tons of fish and shellfish.

Photo of dozens of crab traps

An estimated 500 boats gather annually off the coast of Patagonia

Claudio Andrade

BUENOS AIRES — The 'floating city' of industrial fishing boats has returned, lighting up a long stretch of the South Pacific.

Recently visible off the coast of southern Argentina, aerial photographs showed the well-lit armada of some 500 vessels, parked 201 miles offshore from Comodoro Rivadavia in the province of Chubut. The fleet had arrived for its vast seasonal haul of sea 'products,' confirming its annual return to harvest squid, cod and shellfish on a scale that activists have called an environmental blitzkrieg.

In principle the ships are fishing just outside Argentina's exclusive Economic Zone, though it's widely known that this kind of apparent "industrial harvest" does not respect the territorial line, entering Argentine waters for one reason or another.

For some years now, activists and organizations like Greenpeace have repeatedly denounced industrial-style fishing as exhausting marine resources worldwide and badly affecting regional fauna, even if the fishing outfits technically manage to evade any crackdown by staying in or near international waters.

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