When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Geopolitics

Ivory Coast: French Firepower And Diplomacy Do The Right Thing

Editorial: The French daily Le Figaro gives a warm applause to the government for its timely and efficient intervention to help oust strongman Laurent Gbagbo

Ivory Coast: French Firepower And Diplomacy Do The Right Thing
Pierre Rousselin

PARIS - The fall of Laurent Gbagbo sends a basic yet important message to the rest of the world: anyone who loses an election should pack up and go. It is a message that concerns Africa probably more than any other continent, and one that deserved full engagement from France and of the rest of the international community.

It is, however, a shame that four months of crisis and violent combat was needed to reach this result, that the stubbornness of a single man, who for five long years has denied his people of their lawful democratic elections, had to bring the Ivory Coast into such a sad and bloody mess. Fortunately, Gbagbo has been captured alive so that he can answer for his acts. His trial will be the foundation of a new Africa.

Ivory Coast deserves so much better than what it got these last years. Alassane Ouattara has a huge job ahead of him to rebuild and reconcile this big country with itself, with the help of the international community and France. He will need to be firm but generous with his opponents, and impose the same authority over his allies. Whether he shall fail or succeed in doing that will also be a test for the future of the continent. Because the stakes are so high, foreign countries have to continue supporting Ivory Coast and help it get back up on its feet economically, which is a priority.

France has played an essential role in Ivory Coast, despite being active in the Libyan war as well. It pulled its share of the weight despite a sometimes very stormy relationship with its former colony, and did everything necessary to promote international legality.

Accusations of a "neo-colonial conspiracy" can only be part of Gbagbo's propagandistic fantasies. Ouattara's victory at the polls has been recognized by the Organization of African Unity and by the Economic Community of West African States. No action has been taken without an explicit mandate from the United Nations; the Unicorn Operation, the French Armed Forces's peacekeeping operation, has only acted in support of the United Nations Operation in Ivory Coast.

Alain Le Roy, under secretary general for peacekeeping at the United Nations, deserves much credit for the way in which he has combined the United Nations' legitimacy with France's military capacity. This has allowed the international organization to restore its image and our country to resolve a major crisis.

Read the original article in French.

Photo - seneweb

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Future

Hey ChatGPT, Are You A Google Killer? That's The Wrong Prompt People

Reports that the new AI natural-language chatbot is a threat to Google's search business fails to see that the two machines serve very different functions.

Photo of bubbles exploding

Mind blowing power

DeepMind
Tristan Greene

Since OpenAI unveiled ChatGPT to the world last November, people have wasted little time finding imaginative uses for the eerily human-like chatbot. They have used it to generate code, create Dungeons & Dragons adventures and converse on a seemingly infinite array of topics.

Now some in Silicon Valley are speculating that the masses might come to adopt the ChatGPT-style bots as an alternative to traditional internet searches.

Microsoft, which made an early $1 billion investment in OpenAI, plans to release an implementation of its Bing search engine that incorporates ChatGPT before the end of March. According to a recent article in The New York Times, Google has declared “code red” over fears ChatGPT could pose a significant threat to its $149-billion-dollar-a-year search business.

Could ChatGPT really be on the verge of disrupting the global search engine industry?

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest