JERUSALEM POST (Israel), BBC (UK)

Worldcrunch

An Israeli court ruled Tuesday that the state of Israel was not at fault in the 2003 death of US activist Rachel Corrie.

The Jerusalem Post reports that the Haifa District Court has ruled against the Corrie family, who have been fighting for justice for the pro-Palestinian activist after she was struck and killed by an Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) bulldozer during a protest nine years ago.

Judge Oded Gershon told the court that Corrie - from Olympia, Washington - put herself in danger when she attempted to stop Palestinian homes from being destroyed.

Her death was an accident. The occupation is an accident. The assault on theGaza flotilla was an accident. INJUSTICE edition.cnn.com/2012/08/28/wor…

— Bougary - عيسى بوقري (@ebougary) August 28, 2012

The BBC reports the Corrie family had requested the symbolic sum of $1 in damages and legal expenses. They blame the IDF for deliberately killing 23-year-old Corrie, or at least negligent conduct.

Cindy Corrie, Rachel's mother, told reporters: "From the beginning it was clear that there is a system to protect soldiers and provide them with impunity at the cost of civilians.

"At least we have had access to a court system, which most Palestinians are denied."

The Israeli court decision on Rachel Corrie is shameful; another example of blaming the victim. She will live on... rachelcorriefoundation.org

— Ibrahim Kalin (@ikalin1) August 28, 2012

The family had previously accused the state of Israel of an attempted cover-up, alleging that several pieces of evidence had disappeared, including video surveillance footage allegedly showing events before and after Corrie's death.

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Mariam Nabattu, a religious studies teacher, must work at two schools in central Uganda to make ends meet.

Patricia Lindrio/GPJ Uganda
Edna Namara and Patricia Lindrio

KAMPALA — Allen Asimwe has dedicated more than two decades to teaching geography at a large public high school in southwestern Uganda. Her retirement age, as a public servant entitled to benefits, is just six years away.

She doubts she will wait that long.

“I am determined, I want to quit,” she says, calculating that she could earn more by shifting full time to the salon she opened six years ago to supplement her income. “Given the frustration, I cannot continue in class anymore.”

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