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Israel

Israel Acknowledges Syrian Airstrike - Iran: You Will "Regret" It

ASSOCIATED PRESS, REUTERS, BBC (UK)

Worldcrunch

JERUSALEM – Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak appeared to admit for the first time that his country launched an air raid last week on a military research center near Damascus. Barak's apparent acknowledgment of the Jan. 30 strike on the Syrian target was followed up Monday by a veiled threat against Israel from Iran, a key ally of the Damascus regime.

"They will regret this recent aggression," Saeed Jalili, Secretary of Iran's Supreme National Security Council, told a news conference in Damascus a day after holding talks there with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, according to Reuters.

Speaking in Munich on Sunday, Barak left little doubt that Israel was behind the strike on the Syrian facility that was believed to contain weapons bound for Lebanon. “I keep telling frankly that we said - and that's proof when we said something we mean it - we say that we don't think it should be allowed to bring advanced weapons systems into Lebanon,” reports the Associated Press.

There had been little doubt as to whether Israel was behind the raid before this, as US officials confirmed it came from their allies. The attack was meant to destroy a convoy of SA-17 surface-to-air missiles used to destroy reconnaissance aircrafts gathering intelligence for Israel.

Here's the video broadcast by Syrian TV of the aftermath:

Bashar al-Assad condemned the operation, broadcasted footage of the aftermath and claimed his country was able to cope with “current threats…and aggression,” reports the BBC.

It’s not the first time Israel is held accountable for an air raid in Syria, the last one was in 2007 on a nuclear reactor and arms convoy heading for Hamas headquarters.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Dnipro, A Heinous Attack Sparks Hard Questions About Weapon Supplies — On Both Sides

After Dnipro was left devastated by one of Russia’s deadliest attacks on Ukrainian civilians to date, the problem of arms delivery in a war that keeps escalating has never been more urgent.

Photo France's AMX-10 RC light tanks

France will be sending AMX-10 RC light tanks to Ukraine, but has not committed to heavy combat tanks.

Gouhier Nicolas/Abaca via ZUMA
Pierre Haski

The Russian missile that struck a residential building on Saturday afternoon in Dnipro killed at least 40 people, a number that keeps growing as bodies are discovered under the rubble in the central Ukrainian city. It appears to be a war crime with no legitimate target near the neighborhood.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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This bombing is also particularly informative about what’s happening right now on the Russian side of the war: The KH-22 cruise missile used is designed to sink an aircraft carrier, the biggest one in Moscow’s arsenal.

This precision missile was fired from an aircraft hundreds of miles away and has no link whatsoever to the target.

This enormous gap between the type of missile used and its ultimate target might actually reveal a missile scarcity in Russia, after weeks of continuous bombing in Ukraine. Tapping into strategic Russian weaponry (the KH-22 can be equipped with nuclear warheads) can never be justified considering the innocence of the target. Russian arms plants running at full capacity, for the time being at least, cannot keep up supplies.

But this tragic strike is also a clear sign of a progressive escalation in a war that, at this stage, shows no signs it can be stopped.

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