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BLOOMBERG, KCNA (North Korea)

Worldcrunch

Two days after the surprise departure of the army chief, North Korea's Supreme leader Kim Jong-un is furthering his grip on the military by adding a new title to an already long list of honors.

A statement by state-run news agency KCNA announced that ""A decision was made to award the title of Marshal of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to Kim Jong-un, supreme commander of the Korean People's Army," following days of reshuffling at the highest levels of the military. (see full statement below)

State media said on Wednesday morning that there was "Important News to Be Reported (Urgent)," prompting much speculation – and some trolling – around Twitter:

South Korea has no comment on Kim Jong-un's promotion as it is a domestic matter, Unification Ministry spokesman Kim Hyung Suk told Bloomberg. South Korean President Lee Myung Bak held a national security meeting this morning to discuss developments in North Korea, according to a statement on the presidential website -- the two countries technically remain at war after their 1950-53 conflict ended without a peace treaty.

The "titles' category in Kim Jong-un's curriculum vitae already includes First Chairman of the National Defense Commission, First Secretary of the Workers' Party, Chairman of the party's Central Military Commission, Member of the Presidium of the party's Political Bureau and Supreme commander of the Korean People's Army.

Others, we can imagine, are on their way.

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Members of UN’s IAEA team assessing the situation at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant

Anne-Sophie Goninet, Lisa Berdet, Chloé Touchard and Lila Paulou

👋 Allegra!*

Welcome to Wednesday, where the IAEA says Russia puts pressure on the UN team of nuclear inspectors, there isn’t a white man in sight in Liz Truss’ cabinet, and mammal mia! that’s one very old shrew. Meanwhile, Indian news website The Wire gauges the magnitude of the destruction caused by the recent “monster” monsoon.

[*Romansh, Switzerland]

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