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ABC.AU, SYDNEY MORNING HERALD (Australia), REUTERS

Worldcrunch

PRAGUE - Meet Karel Schwarzenberg, the bow-tied, 75-year-old prince who channels the Sex Pistols and wants to be president of the Czech Republic.

Born into a family that owned large amounts of Czech and Austrian lands, the Schwarzenbergs fled when the Communists took over in 1948, writes Reuters. His opponents have accused him of supporting the cause of the three million Germans who were expelled from the country after World War II., after in a televised interview he said that in today's world, the move could be seen as a war crime.

In the nation’s first direct election for presidency, Schwarzenberg has emerged as the surprise candidate and even more surprisingly, appeals most to younger voters. The Sydney Morning Herald reports that student Klara Dvorakova said “He represents the better, modern side of our nation,” after Schwarzenberg left "Mlejn", a smoky pub near Prague Castle where he often grabs a beer alongside his young supporters in t-shirts sporting his mohawked image. “He’s noble, elegant.”

photo: 4edou via instagram

ABC.AU reports that his campaign includes pop art styled posters (above), his trademark eccentric touch visible, as well as badges (below) that depict him as a punk, sporting a fuchsia-pink mohawked hairdo. One of the slogans used is “Karel for PreSIDent” in a reference to Sid Vicious of the Sex Pistols.

The out-there politician, who speaks 6 languages, has been accused of being “too old” and falling asleep during tedious political meetings but he claims “I fall asleep when others talk nonsense.”

photo: piincekvia instagram

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War In Ukraine, Day 279: New Kherson Horrors More Than Two Weeks After Russian Withdrawal

Shelling in Kherson

Anna Akage, Bertrand Hauger and Emma Albright

While retreating from Kherson, Russian troops forcibly removed more than 2,500 Ukrainians from prison colonies and pre-trial detention centers in the southern region. Those removed included prisoners as well as a large number of civilians who had been held in prisons during the occupation, according to the Ukrainian human rights organization Alliance of Ukrainian Unity.

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The NGO said it has evidence that these Ukrainians were first transferred to Crimea and then distributed to different prisons in Russia. During the transfer of the prisoners, Russian soldiers also reportedly stole valuables and food and mined the building of colony #61.

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