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THE GUARDIAN (UK), CBS NEWS (US)

Worldcrunch

After wrapping up an unusual and notably tight-lipped visit to North Korea, Google Chairman Eric Schmidt urged the Pyongyang regime on Thursday to open up to the Internet or risk the further economic consequences of isolation.

"As the world is becoming increasingly connected, their decision to be virtually isolated is very much going to affect their physical world, their economic growth and so forth," Schmidt said, speaking at the Beijing airport after returning from the four-day trip, CBS News reports. "It will make it harder for them to catch up economically. We made that alternative very, very clear.

Schmidt took part in a delegation led by former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, who urged North Korea to halt missile launches and nuclear tests that have prompted UN sanctions. Richardson was also there to seek the release of Kenneth Bae, a Korean-American held in North Korea since December.

“We were informed that his health was good, that the judicial proceedings would start soon,” the Guardian quoted Richardson as saying, noting that the delegation was not able to meet with Bae. He also urged the government officials to do what was necessary to “calm tensions on the peninsula.”

The unusual trip, which was not sanctioned by the U.S. government, was criticized by some for undermining the traditional channels of U.S. diplomacy and boost Pyongyang's standing.

Eric Schmidt (red scarf) and Bill Richardson (right) in North Korean University, from Youtube expand=1]


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Society

We Still Don't Know How To Fight Fascism — 2016 Warnings Coming To Life

It's no longer accurate to say the "rise" of the far-right — fascism is already here. After Trump's election, a group of prominent analysts gathered to discuss how the left could fight back. Six years later, their insights are more urgent and insightful than ever.

Inside Benito Mussolin's former home in Forli, Italy

Olivia Carballar

-Essay-

MADRID — There were very few who'd ventured to predict that he would win. That night, Nov. 8, 2016, we in Europe went to sleep watching the United States, and woke up in the middle of a nightmare. Donald Trump, whom both the Republican and Democratic establishments and opinion makers had dismissed, had become real. He had won.

Far-right leaders scattered around the world began to send congratulations while protests began to take place in North American cities. The pundits couldn't understand why their brilliant analyses had failed.

Six years later, fascism continues to triumph, for the simple reason that people continue to vote for it. In Italy, it won last Sunday with Giorgia Meloni. The Vox party arrived in Spain a long time ago.

But no one can say that we were not warned. In December 2016, with the arrival of Trump to power,weat La Marea organized a debate to collect the responses the left was devising in the face of this wave that threatens the basic principles of a democracy. They were interesting then, but perhaps they are even more relevant now because they were never implemented.

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