When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Germany

Germany Flicks The Nuke Switch — And Europe Pays

The German nuclear phase out is going to cost European states billions in energy costs. Experts say it may also set off an environmental boomerang.

Night train in Berlin (LHoon)
Night train in Berlin (LHoon)

WorldcrunchNEWS BITES

DIE WELT

BERLIN – After the immediate political and diplomatic fallout, experts have begun to calculate the potential economic – and environmental -- costs of Germany's decision last month to shutter all of its nuclear power plants by 2034. What is certain is that the price will be paid across Europe.

After the German government made the decision to phase out nuclear energy without consulting its EU partners, France's Energy and Industry Minister Eric Besson used twitter to declare that: ‘"Germany may be a sovereign state, but the effects of the decision are European.""

The decision impacts both available energy supply and energy prices in neighboring countries. After the eight oldest German reactors were switched off in the immediate aftermath of Japan's Fukushima disaster, the wholesale price of electrical current went up by 10%, or 5 euros per megawatt hour.

According to some estimates, the increase in the cost of energy for European consumers could end up reaching 40 billion euros.

Another concern raised by both German and other European politicians and experts is that with Germany's transition away from nuclear, the push for clean, renewable energies may also be accompanied by a return to conventional sources such as gas and coal.

Some experts estimate that such a shift could mean a release into the air of an additional 30 million tons of CO2 annually. Quotations for EU emissions certificates rose by 1.5 euros per ton, or about 10%, the day that Germany shut down the first eight reactors. The rise in carbon emissions would also mean a steep rise in the cost of meeting set climate protection targets for both Germany and its neighbors. Increased costs EU-wide for climate protection could run between 4.5 and 7.5 billion euros annually.

Read full article in German by S. Bolzen, D. Wetzel with G. Wüpper

photo - LHoon

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Searching For Marianna, A Pregnant Doctor From Mariupol Held Captive By The Russians

We’ve heard about the plight of the soldiers-turned-prisoners from Mariupol. Here are some traces of the disturbing fate of a young female doctor who’s been taken away.

A paper dove reads "Mariupol" at a shelter for displaced children in Uzhhorod, western Ukraine.

Paweł Smoleński

"Wait for me, because I will return…"

Marianna Mamonova wrote these words to her family, among the text messages and short phone calls that are the only remaining fragments used to piece together her recent past. We also have a photo of her, posted on Russian websites, where she looks into the lens, gaunt and exhausted, signed with a number like a concentration camp prisoner.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

Until the Russian-Ukrainian war, Mamonova’s biography was available to anyone who wanted to know. She was born in 1991, studied at the Ternopil Medical University, and later at the Kyiv Military Academy. After completing her studies, she was sent to work in the coastal city of Berdiansk. Her mother says that this is where her daughter's dream came true: She’d always wanted to be a military doctor, and worked in Berdiansk for three years, receiving the rank of officer in the Ukrainian army.

Beginning in 2014, she’d worked stints as a front-line doctor in the Donbas region, and when Russia invaded Ukraine in February she went to war again. This time in Mariupol.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ