When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Having fun on ice slides Monday at Harbin's Ice and Snow World in northeastern China.
Having fun on ice slides Monday at Harbin's Ice and Snow World in northeastern China.
Worldcrunch

Tuesday, January 6, 2014

GERMANY DIVIDED AS PEGIDA PROTESTS GROW
A record 18,000 people gathered in the eastern German city of Dresden last night for a weekly “anti-Islamization of the West” march, while similar protests are spreading across the country in cities like Berlin, Cologne and Stuttgart. The protesters were met with smaller, opposing rallies denouncing PEGIDA (Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamisation of the West) as racist and xenophobic, while lights were switched off at major sites in disapproval of the weekly demonstration. In the tabloid Bild, 80 public figures from the primary political parties and the media decried the anti-Islamization protests, with former Chancellor Helmut Schmidt calling for his country to “remain open and tolerant.”
Read more in English from Worldcrunch.

ON THIS DAY

Joan of Arc was born 603 years ago today. Find out what else Jan. 6 has given us in
your daily 57-second shot of history.

ISIS PUBLISHES FIRST $2 BILLION BUDGET
The self-proclaimed ISIS caliphate in large areas of Iraq and Syria has published its first annual budget — $2 billion for 2015 with an anticipated $250 million surplus, making it the world’s richest terrorist organization, London-based al-Araby al-Jadeed reports. But Financial Times reports that people in the Iraqi city of Mosul are tired of their taxes and the lack of decent governing structures. “We’ve endured international sanctions, poverty, injustice. But it was never worse than it is now,” one man told reporters. With the price of bread in Syria now equivalent to a third of the daily income of most civilians under ISIS rule, the newspaper concludes that if the caliphate were official, “it would be a country of the poor.”

Keep reading... Show less
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

NATO Entry For Sweden And Finland? Erdogan May Not Be Bluffing

When the two Nordic countries confirmed their intention to join NATO this week, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan repeated his plans to block the application. Accusing Sweden and Finland of' "harboring" some of his worst enemies may not allow room for him to climb down.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared opposition to Finland and Sweden entering NATO

Meike Eijsberg

-Analysis-

LONDON — When Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared his opposition to Finland and Sweden entering NATO, it took most of the West's top diplomatic experts by surprise — with the focus squarely on how Russia would react to having two new NATO members in the neighborhood. (So far, that's been a surprise too)

But now Western oversight on Turkey's stance has morphed into a belief in some quarters that Erdogan is just bluffing, trying to get concessions from the negotiations over such a key geopolitical issue.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

To be clear, any prospective NATO member requires the consent of all 30 member states and their parliaments. So Erdogan does indeed have a card to play, which is amplified by the sense of urgency: NATO, Sweden and Finland are keen to complete the accession process with the war in Ukraine raging and the prospect of strengthening the military alliance's position around the Baltic Sea.

Keep reading... Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch Video Show less
MOST READ