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Geopolitics

Gaza Truce Holding, Massive Russian Cybercrime, IKEA Slumber

Perth commuters team up to free a trapped passenger
Perth commuters team up to free a trapped passenger
Worldcrunch

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

GAZA CEASEFIRE HOLDS FOR SECOND DAY
The Israel-Hamas ceasefire that began yesterday is still holding, ending at least temporarily a month of war in the Gaza Strip, Reuters reports. Negotiations for a more permanent truce between Israel and Hamas are expected to take place in Cairo in the coming days with the help of Egyptian mediators.

AP reports that among Hamas’ negotiating points is an internationally funded reconstruction plan that would be overseen by a Palestinian unity government led by President Mahmoud Abbas.

According toHaaretz, the month of fighting between Hamas and Israel has cost the two sides a combined $8 billion, with most of the damage in Gaza.

Israel has announced the arrest of Hossam Kawasmeh, a Palestinian suspected of leading the group that kidnapped and murdered three Israeli teenagers in June, AFP reports. The West Bank incident triggered an escalation of violence between Hamas and Israel. Kawasmeh told investigators that he received financial help from Hamas to recruit and arm the kidnappers.

SNAPSHOT
Dozens of commuters helped free a passenger whose leg was trapped between a train and a platform at Perth's Stirling station this morning.

ROSETTA SPACECRAFT SUCCESS
Ten years after the European Space Agency (ESA) launched it from French Guiana, the spacecraft Rosetta is now in orbit around the comet affectionately known as “Chury.” Scientists in the Netherlands say this technical feat is a first,The Guardian reports. ESA tweeted “Hello, Comet!” in different languages this morning, as the probe — which cost 1 billion euros — arrived within 100 kilometers of the rubber-duck-shaped comet that is tearing through space at up to 83,000 miles an hour.

VERBATIM
Poor bastard. The smack was too strong? Yeah. And he died.” British singer Marianne Faithfull told Mojo magazine that her drug-dealing ex-boyfriend was responsible for the accidental 1971 “killing” of Jim Morrison, who she claims died of a heroin overdose. Read more here.

LEBANON CEASEFIRE BREACHED
A 24-hour ceasefire between the Lebanese army and Islamist militants was breached this morning as machine gun fire and shelling broke out between both parties, Reuters reports. The truce came into force Tuesday and was intended to end five days of clashes that have killed dozens of people in what is the most serious spillover of the Syrian civil war into Lebanon. According to the Saudi Press Agency, Saudi Arabian King Abdullah has granted $1 billion to help the Lebanese army. Islamist militants have seized the town of Arsal on the Syrian border.

MY GRAND-PÈRE’S WORLD


EMERGENCY EBOLA SUMMIT STARTS
A two-day Ebola crisis summit gathering experts from the World Health Organization opened today in Geneva, Switzerland. They are discussing new measures to tackle the outbreak of the deadly virus in West Africa and will ultimately decide whether to declare a global health emergency, the BBC reports. Nearly 900 people have died from the virus since February.

1.2 BILLION
In what is believed to be the largest ever theft of confidential Internet information, a Russian crime ring has been accused of stealing 1.2 billion passwords and 500 million email addresses. Read more here.

IKEA SLUMBER
The Telegraph knows just exactly how to make our day — with a photo galleryof Chinese IKEA shoppers asleep in the store’s room displays.

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Geopolitics

The Trumpian Virus Undermining Democracy Is Now Spreading Through South America

Taking inspiration from events in the United States over the past four years, rejection of election results and established state institutions is on the rise in Latin America.

Two supporters of far-right Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro dressed in Brazilian flags during a demonstration in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Bolsonaro supporters dressed in national colours with flags in a demonstration in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, on November 4, 2022.

Ivan Abreu / ZUMA
Carlos Ruckauf*

-Analysis-

BUENOS AIRES — South Africa's Nelson Mandela used to say it was "so easy to break down and destroy. The heroes are those who make peace and build."

Intolerance toward those who think differently, even inside the same political space, is corroding the bases of representative democracy, which is the only system we know that allows us to live and grow in freedom, in spite of its flaws.

Recent events in South America and elsewhere are precisely alerting us to that danger. The most explosive example was in Brazil, where a crowd of thousands managed to storm key institutional premises like the presidential palace, parliament and the Supreme Court.

In Peru, the country's Marxist (now former) president, Pedro Castillo, sought to use the armed and security forces to shut down parliament and halt the Supreme Court and state prosecutors from investigating corruption allegations against him.

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