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Israel

Gaza Ceasefire Crumbles, Fighting Continues To Escalate

AL JAZEERA (Qatar), THE GUARDIAN, BBC NEWS (UK), REUTERS

Worldcrunch

JERUSALEM - Two Palestinians were reportedly killed during the visit of Egyptian Prime Minister Hesham Kandil in Gaza, dashing hopes of a possible ceasefire between Israel and Palestine

According to Al Jazeera, a new air strike hit the Jibaliya refugee camp located at the northern end of the Gaza Strip, killing two people, one of them a child, and injuring seven others.

Earlier, Israel pledged to suspend the strikes during Kandil’s visit, if Palestinian militants refrained from firing rockets, thus creating what Reuters called a "tiny window to emergency peace diplomacy in Gaza."

But shortly after the prime minister arrived, Israeli and Palestinian officials accused each other of violating the temporary truce, BBC News reports.

Overnight, Israeli war planes pounded Gaza with around 150 air strikes, with the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) targeting rocket-launching sites and arms depots. The Guardian reports that the Israeli military is calling up 16,000 reservists, after receiving permission to draft up to 30,000 – a clear sign that Israel is preparing to further escalate Operation Pillar of Defense.

At least 20 Palestinians and three Israelis have been killed since the offensive began on Wednesday when Israel killed Ahmed al-Jabari, the military chief of Hamas, and started to shell the coastal enclave in response to increasing rocket fire from Gaza.

Fighting reached a new level on Thursday evening, when two rockets were fired from the Gaza strip on the Tel Aviv area for the first time – although no casualties were reported, one rocket crashing into the sea and the other in an uninhabited part of the Jaffa suburb south of the city.

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Society

Kleptomania, How A "Women's Pathology" Was Built On Gender And Class Bias

Between 1880 and 1930, there was a significant rise in thefts in department stores, mostly committed by women from the middle and upper classes. This situation brought with it the establishment of a new pathology: kleptomania. A century later, feminist historians have given new meaning to the practice as a protest against the social structures and oppressions of capitalism and patriarchy.

Photo of a hand in a pocket

A hand in a pocket

Julia Amigo

Kleptomania is defined as the malicious and curious propensity for theft. The legal language tends to specify that the stolen objects are not items of necessity; medically, it is explained as an uncontrollable impulse.

What seems clear is that kleptomania is a highly enigmatic condition and one of the few mental disorders that comes from the pathologization of a crime, which makes it possible to use it as a legal defense. It differs from the sporadic theft of clothing, accessories, or makeup (shoplifting) as the kleptomaniac's impulse is irresistible.

Studies have shown that less than one percent of the population suffers from kleptomania, being much more common among women (although determining exact numbers is very difficult).

The psychiatric disorders manual, DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) has included kleptomania since 1962. Previously, it had already received attention from, among others, Sigmund Freud. Like nymphomania or hysteria, kleptomania became an almost exclusively female diagnosis linked to the biology of women's bodies and an “inability” to resist uncontrollable desire.

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