When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Geopolitics

French First Lady Tweet-Slaps Hollande’s Ex

Worldcrunch

LE NOUVEL OBS (France)

PARIS - #trierweilergate, #vaudeville… Hashtags have been flourishing on Twitter since Valérie Trierweiler —French President François Hollande's girlfriend— posted an unexpected message endorsing the Socialist candidate running against Hollande's former long-term partner Ségolène Royal in parliamentary elections.

At 11.56AM, Trierweiler (@valtrier) tweeted "Good luck to Olivier Falorni who is a worthy candidate and has been selflessly fighting for years for the people of La Rochelle." Ouch, zing!

At first, it was believed that a prankster had hacked Trierweiler's Twitter account, considering the public swipe put her at odds with President Hollande, who has declared his full support for Royal's electoral bid, Le Nouvel Observateur reports.

But Valérie Trierweiler confirmed her stance to journalists by text message an hour later, triggering scores of comments on the presidential soap opera: "Am wondering whether Family Minister @Dbertinotti should step and do something for @fhollande @valtrier @RoyalSegolene."

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Geopolitics

Utter Pessimism, What Israelis And Palestinians Share In Common

Right now, according to a joint survey of Israelis and Palestinians, hopes for a peaceful solution of coexistence simply don't exist. The recent spate of violence is confirmation of the deepest kind of pessimism on both sides for any solution other than domination of the other.

An old Palestinian protester waves Palestinian flag while he confronts the Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the village of Beit Dajan near the West Bank city of Nablus.

A Palestinian protester confronts Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the West Bank village of Beit Dajan on Jan. 6.

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — Just before the latest outbreak of violence between Israelis and Palestinians, a survey of public opinion among the two peoples provided a key to understanding the current situation unfolding before our eyes.

It was a joint study, entitled "Palestinian-Israeli Pulse", carried out by two research centers, one Israeli, the other Palestinian, which for years have been regularly asking the same questions to both sides.

The result is disastrous: not only is the support for the two-state solution — Israel and Palestine side by side — at its lowest point in two decades, but there is now a significant share of opinion on both sides that favors a "non-democratic" solution, i.e., a single state controlled by either the Israelis or Palestinians.

This captures the absolute sense of pessimism commonly felt regarding the chances of the two-state option ever being realized, which currently appears to be our grim reality today. But the results are also an expression of the growing acceptance on both sides that it is inconceivable for either state to live without dominating the other — and therefore impossible to live in peace.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest