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Geopolitics

Former NYC Mayor Ed Koch Dead At 88

AP, NEW YORK POST (U.S.)

Worldcrunch

NEW YORK- Former New York Mayor Ed Koch died early Friday at the age of 88. A spokesperson said that Koch, who ran NYC city hall through most of the 1980s, died of congestive heart failure.

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PATRICK J. CASHIN & US NAVY

In and out of the hospital for the last few months, Koch was moved into ICU yesterday as his condition worsened, reports the New York Post.

According to the AP, Koch embodied New York for the rest of the world. He won a national reputation with his feisty style and his trademark question, "How'm I doing?".

During his years as mayor, 1978-1989, his tight policies pulled the city out of severe financial trouble. After leaving elected office, he worked as a lawyer but remained active in the Big Apple’s political scene.

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Ed Koch Bridge Lasse Fuss

His legacy lives on in the name of the bridge at 59th Street in Manhattan that connects the borough to Queens, that was renamed in his honor in 2011 as the Ed Koch Queensboro bridge.

The New York Times described Koch as a "colorful, candid New Yorker who led city through crisis."

Here are two other New Yorkers singing about the bridge now named in his honor:


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Society

India Higher Education Inferior Complex: Where Are The Foreign University Campuses?

The proposed UGC guidelines are ill-conceived and populist, and hardly take note of the educational and financial interests of foreign universities.

Image of a group of five people sitting on the grass inside of the Indian Institute of Technology campus.

The IIT - Indian Institute of Technology - Campus

M.M Ansari and Mohammad Naushad Khan

NEW DELHI — Nearly 800,000 young people from India attend foreign universities every year in search of quality education and entrepreneurial training, resulting in a massive outflow of resources – $3 billion – to finance their education. These students look for greener pastures abroad because of the lack of quality teaching and research in most of India’s higher education institutions.

Over 40,000 colleges and 1,000 universities are producing unemployable graduates who cannot function in a knowledge- and technology-intensive economy.

The Indian government's solution is to open doors to foreign universities, with a proposed set of regulations aiming to provide higher education and research services to match global standards, and to control the outflow of resources. But this decision raises many questions.

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