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EL ESPECTADOR, EL MUNDO, EL TIEMPO(Colombia)

Worldcrunch

BOGOTA- Colombia's FARC rebels have announced the end of a two-month unilateral ceasefire after the Colombian government refused to join the truce.

Photo: FARC flag via Wikipedia

The FARC, or Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, declared the ceasefire when peace talks with the government began on Nov. 19 in Havana, Cuba – giving the Colombian government two months to join the truce.

Ivan Marquez, the FARC lead negociator, told reporters that “with pain in our hearts, we have to accept a return to the stage of warfare between the two sides which is something that nobody in the country wants," reports El Mundo.

President Juan Manuel Santos warned the rebels against resuming violence and said: "Terrorist acts are cowardly acts because they don't fight against soldiers or members of the police force, they inflict damage on civil society," according to El Tiempo.

El Espectador reports that several incidents during the ceasefire period shows that some FARC members did not obey the truce and makes it clear that the leaders, including negotiator Ivan Marquez, do not have complete control over their men.

Between Nov. 20 and Dec. 17 2012 there were 57 incidents that involved civilians and a demand was issued to the group "to abide by the rules of international humanitarian law" by the national ombudsman Jorge Armando Otalora.

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Geopolitics

Why Fast-Tracking Ukraine's NATO Entry Is Such A Bad Idea

Ukraine's President Zelensky should not be putting pressure for NATO membership now. It raises the risk of a wider war, and the focus should be on continuing arms deliveries from the West. After all, peace will be decided on the battlefield.

American soldiers from the U.S. army during a training exercise in Grafenwoehr, Germany

Christoph B. Schiltz

-OpEd-

Nine NATO member states from Eastern Europe and the Western Balkans are now putting pressure for the military alliance to welcome Ukraine.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky has been calling for "accelerated accession."

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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As understandable as it is that his country wants to join a strong defensive military alliance like NATO, the timing is wrong. Of course, we must acknowledge the Ukrainian people's heroic fight for survival. But Zelensky must be careful not to overstretch the West's willingness to support him.

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