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Germany

Exclusive: Bin Laden’s Letter To A Terrorist Cell in Germany

Among the documents found in the dead terrorist leader’s house in Pakistan was one that appears to have been destined for a terrorist operative in Düsseldorf who was planning an attack in Germany.

Bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad (Sajjad Ali Qureshi)
Bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad (Sajjad Ali Qureshi)
Florian Flade

According to information received by Die Welt, a document found in Osama Bin Laden's quarters in Abbottabad, Pakistan, shows that Bin Laden may have been in direct contact with an Islamist terrorist cell in Germany.

The US Navy Seals who conducted the mission in Abbottabad brought the documents found on the premises back to the US where they have been evaluated during the past weeks. CIA analysts paid particular attention to any material that looked as if it might point to imminent terrorist action.

Die Welt sources say that an English translation of an unfinished letter in Arabic written by Bin Laden has been sent by the CIA to European intelligence services. The letter mentions several European cells and a number of terror suspects by name, among them the supposed addressee, Abdeladim el-K., a German of Moroccan descent.

Only days before Bin Laden's death, the same man was arrested by German authorities. Abdeladim el-K. is alleged to be the head of the "Düsseldorf Cell," a three-man unit said to have been planning a bomb attack in Germany.

On April 29, in Düsseldorf and Karlsruhe, suspects Abdeladim el-K., Jamil S., and a German of Iranian descent, Amid C., were taken into custody. German authorities conducting investigations into terror cells in Germany had -- in collaboration with the CIA and Moroccan authorities -- already sniffed out El-K. By tapping phone calls and secretly going through the contents of El-K.s computer, they learned of the planned terror attack.

According to Germany's Federal Criminal Police Office (BKA), in 2010 El-K. went to a terrorist training camp in Pakistan where he had direct contact with al-Qaeda leadership. Back in Germany, he apparently tried to get in touch with his al-Qaeda contacts via the Internet, but, having failed, decided to go ahead with the bomb attack independently.

Read the original story in German

photo - Sajjad Ali Qureshi

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Future

Listening For Illness: Your Voice May Soon Help Detect Health Problems

Applying Artificial intelligence to vocal cues is increasingly being used to detect a range of illnesses from COVID-19 to asthma and even depression. But such technology also comes with serious ethical concerns.

photo of a man yelling with white paint in background

What's that you say?

Guillaume de Germain Unsplash
Benoît Georges

PARIS — Thanks to artificial intelligence (AI), your voice can already be used to dictate messages to your smartphone, give commands to your Bluetooth speakers, or chat with your car's dashboard. But soon, it may be able to evaluate the state of your health by detecting respiratory (asthma, COVID-19) or neurodegenerative illnesses. It could even pick up mental health struggles, such as depression or anxiety.

The concept is simple: every pathology that affects the lungs, the heart, the brain, the muscles, or the vocal cords can lead to voice modifications. By using digital tools to analyze a recording, it must be possible to detect vocal biomarkers, the same way vocal recognition algorithms learned to understand a spoken language based on millions of sound samples.

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