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InterNations -Your expat community

AL JAZEERA (Qatar), HAARETZ (Israel), CNN (USA)

Worldcrunch

CAIRO - Egypt launched air strikes in North Sinai early Wednesday killing twenty suspected terrorists in response to a series of attacks by masked gunmen on military checkpoints, reports CNN.

Egyptian army Apache helicopters fired rockets at armed militants near the port town of El Arish.

Witnesses in Sheikh Zouaid, about six miles from Gaza, said they saw two military jets and heard sounds of explosions. Other witnesses in a nearby area said they saw three cars hit, reports Haaretz.

"Over 48 hours since that audacious and shocking attack on the Egyptian military post here in Sinai, it seems that the army has decided to hit back," said Al Jazeera reporter Jamal Elshayyal.

It is the first time that the Egyptian air force has been called into action in Sinai since 1973, adds Israeli newspaper Haaretz.

This clash comes less than three days after a previous attack in Sinai which killed 16 Egyptian gunmen as a group of terrorists tried to force its way through the border in Rafah, which is the only crossing into Gaza not controlled by Israel.

No group has yet claimed responsibility for the initial Sinai attack, reports Al Jazeera.

According to the Qatari news channel, Egypt and Israel say both Islamist fighters from the Sinai and Palestinian allies from the Gaza Strip are active in northern Sinai.

Egypt has begun to seal off smuggling tunnels into the Gaza Strip.

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Green

Good COP, Bad COP? How Sharm El-Sheik Failed On The Planet's Big Question

The week-long climate summit in Egypt managed to a backsliding that looked possible at some point, it still failed to deliver on significant change to reverse the effects of global warming.

Photo of a potted tree lying overturned on the ground in Sharm el-Sheikh as the COP27 summit concludes.

A potted tree lies overturned on the ground in Sharm el-Sheikh as the COP27 summit concludes.

Matt McDonald*

For 30 years, developing nations have fought to establish an international fund to pay for the “loss and damage” they suffer as a result of climate change. As the COP27 climate summit in Egypt wrapped up over the weekend, they finally succeeded.

While it’s a historic moment, the agreement of loss and damage financing left many details yet to be sorted out. What’s more, many critics have lamented the overall outcome of COP27, saying it falls well short of a sufficient response to the climate crisis. As Alok Sharma, president of COP26 in Glasgow, noted:

"Friends, I said in Glasgow that the pulse of 1.5 °C was weak. Unfortunately it remains on life support."

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