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Egypt

Egypt: Early Election Returns Favor Muslim Brotherhood’s FJP

The Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) looks set to finish first following Thursday’s second round election for the People’s Assembly. Early results have the Nour Party in second place in most of the country’s governorates.

*NEWSBITES

CAIRO -- Early results after Thursday's second round of the People's Assembly elections in Egypt show Islamists once again leading the pack.

The Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) list took the most votes in the Giza Governorate's first constituency, followed by the Nour, Wafd and Wasat party lists, according to initial counts. In Giza's second district, FJP candidate Gamal al-Ashry has so far received the most votes for the professional single-winner seat. In second is Nour candidate Nasser Ouda.

"Count the votes, you will find them Islamic," shouted FJP supporters in Talebeya after the first results began tricking in.

The FJP leads in Sohag, Sharrquiya, Monufiya and Aswan as well, followed in all four governorates by the Nour Party. The latters appears to be leading the FJP in Suez Governorate, where other competing lists did not receive any significant number of votes.

In Ismailia Governorate, initial results also showed the FJP and Nour Party lists finding success, followed by the Egyptian Bloc, Wafd Party, New Independent Party, Wa'iy (Consciousness) Party and Revolution Continues Coalition lists.

Al-Masry Al-Youm learned that nearly 60,000 Egyptian expatriates voted in the election. The FJP list garnered 25,450 votes, followed by the Egyptian Bloc list with 10,000, Nour Party list with 5,300, the Revolution Continues Coalition list with 2,300, the Wasat Party list with 2,100 and the Wafd Party list with 1,900, the Foreign Ministry reported late Thursday night.

Read more from Al-Masry Al-Youm

Photo - Roomeya

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Green

Bricks Of Weed! The House Of The Future Could Be Made Of Hemp

Hemp has long had more uses than getting high. The plant is now increasingly being used in the construction of houses, with huge benefits for the climate. The only issue is growing enough to meet surging demand.

Blocks of hemp used for house construction.

Jan Grossarth

OLDENBURG — To be clear: Nobody smoked weed at the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the first semi-detached house made of hemp in Lower Saxony in northwest Germany. This rite-of-passage ceremony to celebrate the completion of the building served nothing more than cold beer.

Christian Eiskamp had spent decades building single-family houses in the sprawling housing complexes in the south of Oldenburg, a city of just over 100,000 people. Then he had the intuition that the heyday of concrete could be coming to an end because of its poor impact on the climate. Searching on Google, he found hemp as an alternative building material.

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