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Egypt

Egypt: Early Election Returns Favor Muslim Brotherhood’s FJP

The Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) looks set to finish first following Thursday’s second round election for the People’s Assembly. Early results have the Nour Party in second place in most of the country’s governorates.

*NEWSBITES

CAIRO -- Early results after Thursday's second round of the People's Assembly elections in Egypt show Islamists once again leading the pack.

The Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party (FJP) list took the most votes in the Giza Governorate's first constituency, followed by the Nour, Wafd and Wasat party lists, according to initial counts. In Giza's second district, FJP candidate Gamal al-Ashry has so far received the most votes for the professional single-winner seat. In second is Nour candidate Nasser Ouda.

"Count the votes, you will find them Islamic," shouted FJP supporters in Talebeya after the first results began tricking in.

The FJP leads in Sohag, Sharrquiya, Monufiya and Aswan as well, followed in all four governorates by the Nour Party. The latters appears to be leading the FJP in Suez Governorate, where other competing lists did not receive any significant number of votes.

In Ismailia Governorate, initial results also showed the FJP and Nour Party lists finding success, followed by the Egyptian Bloc, Wafd Party, New Independent Party, Wa'iy (Consciousness) Party and Revolution Continues Coalition lists.

Al-Masry Al-Youm learned that nearly 60,000 Egyptian expatriates voted in the election. The FJP list garnered 25,450 votes, followed by the Egyptian Bloc list with 10,000, Nour Party list with 5,300, the Revolution Continues Coalition list with 2,300, the Wasat Party list with 2,100 and the Wafd Party list with 1,900, the Foreign Ministry reported late Thursday night.

Read more from Al-Masry Al-Youm

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Coronavirus

Why Long COVID Is Still Such A Mystery To Researchers

Both long and post-COVID are still misunderstood by the general public and the scientific community. This can cause even more suffering for those affected, who already fear their symptoms being dismissed as psychosomatic.

Why Long COVID Is Still Such A Mystery To Researchers

Patients are fighting for their symptoms to be recognized

Edda Grabar

Christoph Kleinschnitz chooses his words very carefully. He knows that he can’t afford to put a foot wrong, otherwise he’s going to cause all sorts of trouble. So his first sentence is unequivocal: “Long COVID and post-COVID both exist. There is no doubt about that.”

Kleinschnitz has good reason to be cautious. The director of neurology at Essen University Hospital recently appeared as an expert in a controversial documentary by doctor and TV presenter Eckart von Hirschhausen, where he pointed out that for some patients who are apparently suffering from long COVID, their symptoms may be intensified – or even fully explained – by psychological causes. Since that appearance, sufferers have branded him a long COVID and post-COVID denier.

Nothing could be further from the truth, says Kleinschnitz. The only thing he questions is the apparent frequency of long COVID and post-COVID cases – and a colleague’s claim to have cured herself with a highly controversial treatment: flushing antibodies, which she believed were causing her symptoms, out of her blood. Depending on the number of treatments required, this can cost up to €10,000.

Kleinschnitz’s appearance in Hirschhausen’s film only lasted two minutes. But it was enough to spark attacks against not only him but also his family.

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