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SANA, AL IKHBARIYA (Syria), BBC (UK), AP (USA)

Worldcrunch

A bomb attached to a fuel truck shook the Syrian capital Damascus, injuring three people, Syrian state-television reports Wednesday morning.

The bomb exploded in the car park of the Dama Rose Hotel, which is popular among UN observers -- however, none of the injured parties is thought to be a UN staff member.

Massive blast hits a major building in Damascus, Syria. This is happening NOW - twitter.com/Nora0315/statu…

— Nora Basha (@Nora0315) August 15, 2012

The target was not immediately clear, however, Associated Press reported that the blast took place close to a military compound.

Heavy shelling on Al-Tall suburb of #Damascus. Sounds can be heard in the capital, rate of one shell every 10 seconds. #Syria

— Ameer (@7__r) August 9, 2012

The BBC reported that Syria's Deputy Foreign Minister Faisal Mekdad, who visited the scene told reporters: "I confirm that we are with the UN and we will do all we can to guarantee their protection so that they carry out their role."

He said the incident was "a criminal act aimed at distorting Syria's image."

Published on the Telegraph's website, this video footage from pro-government television agency Al-Ikhbariya shows the aftermath of the bomb today.

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Society

Gun Violence In America: Don't Blame The Victims — That Means Rappers Too

The recent shooting of Takeoff, a rapper, is another sad incident of gun crime in the U.S. But those blaming hip hop culture for contributing to gun violence ignore that rappers themselves are also victims. And the real point is that in today's America, nobody is safe from gun violence.

Gun Violence In America: Don't Blame The Victims — That Means Rappers Too

Fans wait outside State Farm Arena in Atlanta to attend the memorial service for Migos rapper Takeoff on Nov. 11

A.D. Carson

Add the name of Takeoff, a member of the popular rap trio Migos, to the ever-growing list of rappers, recent and past, tragically and violently killed.

The initial reaction to the shooting to death of Takeoff, born Kirsnick Ball, on Nov. 1, was to blame rap music and hip hop culture. People who engaged in this kind of scapegoating argue that the violence and despairing hopelessness in the music are the cause of so many rappers dying.

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