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Geopolitics

Costa Rican Official In Hot Water After Sexy Video Goes Viral

24HORAS (Costa Rica), CLARIN (Argentina), CNN EN ESPAÑOL

SAN JOSE - Costa Rican Vice-Minister of Youth Karina Bolaños is in hot water after a ‘hot" video of her, lying in bed wearing only lingerie and flirting with the camera began to circulate on the Internet, 24Horas reported.

Adding to the controversy, the video was meant not for Bolaños's husband, a well-known politician, but her boyfriend with whom she was having an affair. Laura Chinchilla, the President of Costa Rica, has personally requested Bolaños's resignation, and Bolaño was officially relieved of her duties earlier this week. But the government says it is not the sexual video that prompted calls for her resignation, but rather accusations of harassment from Bolaños's ex-boyfriend, as well as the failure to report that she was being extorted in exchange for not publishing the video, Clarin reported.

Bolaños says that the video, which was recorded in 2007, was stolen from her computer by an IT engineer she had hired to install surveillance cameras in her home. She says the engineer then demanded money in exchange for not publishing the video, Clarin reported.

In an interview with CNN en Español, Bolaños apologized but said that she did not feel that she had anything to be ashamed of, and that her forced resignation was an injustice.

At the beginning of the video, below, Bolaños says "Hello Pequis, here I am. You're really asking a lot of me, I'm not used to doing this."

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Geopolitics

Smaller Allies Matter: Afghanistan Offers Hard Lessons For Ukraine's Future

Despite controversies at home, Nordic countries were heavily involved in the NATO-led war in Afghanistan. As the Ukraine war grinds on, lessons from that conflict are more relevant than ever.

Photo of Finnish Defence Forces in Afghanistan

Finnish Defence Forces in Afghanistan

Johannes Jauhiainen

-Analysis-

HELSINKI — In May 2021, the Taliban took back power in Afghanistan after 20 years of international presence, astronomical sums of development aid and casualties on all warring sides.

As Kabul fell, a chaotic evacuation prompted comparisons to the fall of Saigon — and most of the attention was on the U.S., which had led the original war to unseat the Taliban after 9/11 and remained by far the largest foreign force on the ground. Yet, the fall of Kabul was also a tumultuous and troubling experience for a number of other smaller foreign countries who had been presented for years in Afghanistan.

In an interview at the time, Antti Kaikkonen, the Finnish Minister of Defense, tried to explain what went wrong during the evacuation.

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“Originally we anticipated that the smaller countries would withdraw before the Americans. Then it became clear that getting people to the airport had become more difficult," Kaikkonen said. "So we decided last night to bring home our last soldiers who were helping with the evacuation.”

During the 20-year-long Afghan war, the foreign troop presence included many countries:Finland committed around 2,500 soldiers,Sweden 8,000,Denmark 12,000 and Norway 9,000. And in the nearly two years since the end of the war, Finland,Belgium and theNetherlands have commissioned investigations into their engagements in Afghanistan.

As the number of fragile or failed states around the world increases, it’s important to understand how to best organize international development aid and the security of such countries. Twenty years of international engagement in Afghanistan offers valuable lessons.

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