When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Geopolitics

Correa Sweeps To Victory In Ecuador, Vows To Push People's 'Revolution'

EL UNIVERSO, EL COMERCIO, LA HORA (Ecuador)

Worldcrunch

QUITO - Incumbent Rafael Correa has been reelected to a second term as President of Ecuador, handily defeating his opponents with more than 56% of the vote to avoid the need for a runoff.

By early Monday, with more than 11 million ballots cast, the National Electoral Council in Ecuador reported that Correa had garnered 56.7% of the votes, followed by Guillermo Lasso with 23.3% and Lucio Gutiérrez with 6.6%.

Correa, 49, appeared in the Palace of Carondelet in the capital, Quito, after his victory was assured, thanking his supporters for backing his so-called Revolución Ciudadana (Citizen’s Revolution), Alianza PAIS that looks to implement a sort of 21st century brand of socialism. “All the highways and hospitals are for everyone. We have never failed you,” he said. “With all the mistakes we could make, let the Ecuadorian people be assured that in this revolution, they will rule.”

A file photo of Correa (municipio pinas)

El Universo reports that he referred to comments he made against the gay and lesbian community that were criticized during his last term, and reiterated his apologies insisting he will fight against stereotypes.

Correa said that his “governmental arms” are also open to those who don't necessarily agree with his ideology.

[rebelmouse-image 27086311 alt="""" original_size="320x213" expand=1]

According to La Hora, He dedicated his victory to Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez -- who has just returned home after two months of cancer treatment in Cuba -- and called on Latin America to unite to counter a “very cruel neo-liberal globalization.”

No major irregularities were reported, with some 76,000 military and police -- and 320 international observers -- on hand at polling places to ensure free voting.

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Society

In Northern Kenya, Where Climate Change Is Measured In Starving Children

The worst drought in 40 years, which has deepened from the effects of climate change, is hitting the young the hardest around the Horn of Africa. A close-up look at the victims, and attempts to save lives and limit lasting effects on an already fragile region in Kenya.

Photo of five mothers holding their malnourished children

At feeding time, nurses and aides encourage mothers to socialize their children and stimulate them to eat.

Georgina Gustin

KAKUMA — The words "Stabilization Ward" are painted in uneven black letters above the entrance, but everyone in this massive refugee camp in Kakuma, Kenya, calls it ya maziwa: The place of milk.

Rescue workers and doctors, mothers and fathers, have carried hundreds of starving children through the doors of this one-room hospital wing, which is sometimes so crowded that babies and toddlers have to share beds. A pediatric unit is only a few steps away, but malnourished children don’t go there. They need special care, and even that doesn’t always save them.

In an office of the International Rescue Committee nearby, Vincent Opinya sits behind a desk with figures on dry-erase boards and a map of the camp on the walls around him. “We’ve lost 45 children this year due to malnutrition,” he says, juggling emergencies, phone calls, and texts. “We’re seeing a significant increase in malnutrition cases as a result of the drought — the worst we’ve faced in 40 years.”

From January to June, the ward experienced an 800 percent rise in admissions of children under 5 who needed treatment for malnourishment — a surge that aid groups blame mostly on a climate change-fueled drought that has turned the region into a parched barren.

Opinya, the nutrition manager for the IRC here, has had to rattle off these statistics many times, but the reality of the numbers is starting to crack his professional armor. “It’s a very sad situation,” he says, wearily. And he believes it will only get worse. A third year of drought is likely on the way.

More children may die. But millions will survive malnutrition and hunger only to live through a compromised future, researchers say. The longer-term health effects of this drought — weakened immune systems, developmental problems — will persist for a generation or more, with consequences that will cascade into communities and societies for decades.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest