When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

AL-MASRY AL-YOUM (Egypt), HAARETZ (Israel), THEJERUSALEM POST (Israel)

Worldcrunch

JERUSALEM - On the tail end of a tricky Asian and Middle East tour, US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has arrived in Israel for a 24-hour visit that will include talks with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on a thorny array of issues: the stalled Israeli-Palestinian peace process, Iran and the new leadership in Egypt,

Clinton flew to Israel from Egypt, where she held talks over the weekend with new President Mohamed Morsi, a former Muslim Brotherhood member, who told her Egypt would respect its international treaties –including a peace treaty with Israel, Cairo daily Al-Masry Al-Youm reports.

Clinton's visit to Egypt was not without troubles: upon her departure on Sunday, protesters hurled tomatoes and shoes at her motorcade – although neither Clinton nor her vehicle were hit by the projectiles.

Arriving in Israel, Clinton told President Shimon Peres that the transformations that the Middle East were undergoing required "friends like us to think together and act together," Israeli daily The Jerusalem Post reports.

US Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta is also due to arrive in Jerusalem next week to conduct talks on Iran's nuclear program, and the deteriorating situation in Syria, according to Israel's oldest daily newspaper Haaretz.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Society

Mahsa Amini, Martyr Of An Iranian Regime Designed To Abuse Women

The 22-year-old is believed to have been beaten to death at a Tehran police station last week after "morality police" had reprimanded her clothing. The case has sparked the nation's outrage. But as ordinary Iranians testify, such beatings, torture and a home brand of misogyny are hallmarks of the 40-year Islamic Republic of Iran.

Mahsa Amini

Firouzeh Nordstrom

-Analysis-

TEHRAN — The death in Iran of a 22-year-old Mahsa Amini — after she was arrested by the so-called "morality police" — has unleashed another wave of protests, as thousands of Iranians vent their fury against an intrusive and violent regime. Indeed, as tragically exceptional as the circumstances appear, the reaction reflects the daily reality of abuse by authorities, especially directed toward women

Amini, a Kurdish-Iranian girl visiting Tehran with relatives, was detained by the regime's morality patrols on Sept. 13, apparently for not respecting the Islamic dress code that includes proper use of the hijab headscarf. Amini was declared dead two or three days after being taken into custody. Officials say she fainted and died, and blamed a preexisting heart condition. But neither her family nor anyone else in Iran believe that, as can be seen in the mounting protests that have now left at least three dead.

For Amini's was hardly the first arbitrary arrest, or the first suspected death in custody under Iran's Islamic regime.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ