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Geopolitics

Cleveland Kidnapper-Rapist Ariel Castro Found Hanged In Cell

REUTERS, AP, BBC

Worldcrunch

CLEVELAND — Ariel Castro, the Cleveland man sentenced to life in prison for the kidnapping, rape and beatings of three Cleveland women he held captive in his house for nearly 10 years, was found hanged in his prison cell late Tuesday evening, Reuters reports.

According to a prison official quoted by Associated Press, Castro is believed to have committed suicide. JoEllen Smith, a spokeswoman for the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction, wrote in a statement: "Upon finding inmate Castro, prison medical staff began performing life saving measures. Shortly after he was transported to the prison medical facility where he was pronounced dead at 10:52 pm."

Castro, 53, had been placed in protective custody because of the media impact of his case, but was not on suicide watch, according to the BBC. Smith explained: "He was housed in protective custody which means he was in a cell by himself and rounds are required every 30 minutes at staggered intervals." She added that a "thorough review" of the incident was under way to establish how Castro was able to hang himself.

The former school bus driver had been sentenced to life plus 1,000 years in prison on August 1. He pleaded guilty to 937 counts including rape and kidnapping. He abducted three young women between 2002 and 2004 and kept them chained up. They escaped from Castro's home on May 6 when one of them, Amanda Berry, managed to break part of a door and yelled through the crack for neighbors to help them.

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Geopolitics

Utter Pessimism, What Israelis And Palestinians Share In Common

Right now, according to a joint survey of Israelis and Palestinians, hopes for a peaceful solution of coexistence simply don't exist. The recent spate of violence is confirmation of the deepest kind of pessimism on both sides for any solution other than domination of the other.

An old Palestinian protester waves Palestinian flag while he confronts the Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the village of Beit Dajan near the West Bank city of Nablus.

A Palestinian protester confronts Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the West Bank village of Beit Dajan on Jan. 6.

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — Just before the latest outbreak of violence between Israelis and Palestinians, a survey of public opinion among the two peoples provided a key to understanding the current situation unfolding before our eyes.

It was a joint study, entitled "Palestinian-Israeli Pulse", carried out by two research centers, one Israeli, the other Palestinian, which for years have been regularly asking the same questions to both sides.

The result is disastrous: not only is the support for the two-state solution — Israel and Palestine side by side — at its lowest point in two decades, but there is now a significant share of opinion on both sides that favors a "non-democratic" solution, i.e., a single state controlled by either the Israelis or Palestinians.

This captures the absolute sense of pessimism commonly felt regarding the chances of the two-state option ever being realized, which currently appears to be our grim reality today. But the results are also an expression of the growing acceptance on both sides that it is inconceivable for either state to live without dominating the other — and therefore impossible to live in peace.

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