When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

KIEV POST (Ukraine), INTERNEWSEURASIA (U.S.), DIE ZEIT (Germany), BBC NEWS (U.K.), HURRIYET (Turkey)

Worldcrunch

KIEV - The Russia-friendly Party of Regions of incumbent president Viktor Yanukovych was claiming victory Monday in the closely watched Ukraine parliamentary elections. Together with its Communist party allies, the Regions party says it will have a simple majority in the 450-seat Ukraine parliament after Sunday's vote.

The Kiev Post reported Monday that foreign observers sent to monitor the elections in the Ukraine complained that the vote was “an apparent reversal in Ukraine’s democratic progress.” The official observers said that media had been controlled by the incumbent government, and that some parties in the election had no representation on election commissions, and that there was a general lack of transparency. The Post dubbed it an “oligarchization” of the vote.

Top opposition leader, Yulia Tymoshenko, Ukraine's former prime minister, has had to follow the vote from in prison, sentenced last year to seven years for “abuse of power.”

Of the five main political parties battling for vote, there was also the Udar or Punch party of Vitali Klitschko, a former heavyweight boxing champion; and Svoboda, a nationalist party which in the past was known for its racist and anti-semitic bent. The parties won respectively about 13%, and 8 % of the vote, according to the BBC, guaranteeing even Svoboda at least one seat in parliament. Timoshynko’s party acknowledged the victory of the president’s party.

Still, foreign observers noted widespread problems and corruption. A Die Zeitreporter in Irpin, a university town north of Kiev, witnessed voters being given envelopes after voting, and interviewed a man who said that five extra voters were registered to his home.

In an interview with Die Zeitbefore the election,Klitschko said that Ukraine was seen as a third-world nation, with six million Ukrainians working abroad, and was almost at the bottom of the global transparency index. According to Klitschko, half of Ukrainians see no future in their homeland and 70 % of school leavers want to emigrate. “These are facts,” he told Die Zeit. Klitschko added that students in Kiev were being paid 15 euros to vote for the president’s party.

After the election, monitors denounced a lack of transparency, and clear signs of corruption. “Ukraine’s streak of four relatively democratic national elections, from 2004 to 2012, has come to an end with the Oct. 28 parliamentary vote,” the Kiev Post concluded.

Zombies encourage young people not to be passive in the election

The runup to the election was colorful. The Internews website hired zombies to go around Kiev as a gag to encourage young people to vote. Turkish newspaper Hurriyet, reporting from Kiev, listed among the candidates, besides Klitschko, “an extravagantly dressed pop diva, a retired football star, the son of a famous actor, and an opposition leader suspiciously cozy with the government.” The football star was Andrij Shevchenko, former striker for AC Milan, a candidate for Ukraine Forward, a party “widely believed to be supported by the ruling party and aimed at siphoning off opposition votes,” according to Hurriyet.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!

Members of the search and rescue team from Miami search the rubble for missing persons at Fort Myers Beach, after Florida was hit by Hurricane Ian.

Sophia Constantino, Laure Gautherin, Anne-Sophie Goninet

👋 Shlamaloukh!*

Welcome to Tuesday, where North Korea reportedly fires a missile over Japan for the first time in five years, Ukrainian President Zelensky signs a decree vowing to never negotiate with Russia while Putin is in power, and a lottery win raises eyebrows in the Philippines. Meanwhile, Argentine daily Clarin looks at how the translation of a Bible in an indigenous language in Chile has sparked a debate over the links between language, colonialism and cultural imposition.

[*Assyrian, Syria]

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ