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TELESUR, ULTIMAS NOTICIAS, EL NACIONAL (Venezuela), BBC(UK)

Worldcrunch

CARACAS - Venezuelan Vice President Nicolas Maduro has told Latin American TV network teleSUR that he had visited President Chavez twice in the past days and that he had shown “gigantic force” as they spoke of political issues.

Chavez is currently in Havana, Cuba, where he underwent his fourth cancer-related surgery on Dec. 11. It was reported that he suffered complications from the surgery.

In his interview with teleSUR, Maduro called on Venezuelans to “immunize themselves from the rumors and lies being circulated on social networks and opposition media.” Those who are spreading the rumors about Chavez" demise, he said, are “the enemies of Venezuela, the right-wing journalists,” who are “mentally ill, hateful and have no boundaries or respect for families, for the people.”

“I saw the President, he greeted me and squeezed my hand with gigantic force as we talked,” said Maduro. “The commander is fully aware of the complexity of his situation and has asked me to report the truth to the people, which I have done and will continue to do.” (*see below for correction)

According to El Nacional, dissident Cuban blogger Yoani Sanchez was among those tweeting about the rumors circulating in Havana. “The rumors are growing in Havana concerning the status of Hugo Chavez’ health. Even though we are used to the secrets, we are not idiots,” she tweeted.

#Cuba Los rumores crecen en La #Habana sobre el estado de salud de #HugoChavez Aunque estamos acostumbrados al secretismo no somos tontos...

— Yoani Sánchez (@yoanisanchez) January 1, 2013

After spending four days in Havana, the Vice President returned to Venezuela on Wednesday, reported Ultima Noticias, to take back the reigns of the government, which Chavez handed him on Dec. 8, before his departure for Cuba.

It is not known whether Chavez would be able to be inaugurated for another term as planned on Jan. 10, but Venezuelan National Assembly leader Diosdado Cabello has recently said that the inauguration ceremony would be delayed if Chavez wasn't well enough to make it.

But, according to the BBC, the opposition says such a move would be unconstitutional: "The Venezuelan constitution states that a new election should be called in 30 days should the president not be fit enough to attend his inauguration."

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Photo Fabio Rodrigues Pozzebom/ABr on Wikipedia

*An earlier version of this article and the headline incorrectly referred to Maduro's characterization of Chavez as being aware of the "gravity" of his condition. He used the word "complexity."

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Society

Single Parents In Portugal Turn "It Takes A Village" Into A Practical Reality

The death of a young child left alone at home while his single mother was out shocked a community. Now, single parents have banded together to offer support to each other. And they're succeeding in the face of overwhelming challenges.

Single Parents In Portugal Turn "It Takes A Village" Into A Practical Reality

Women from the association Jangada D'Emoções, which started Colo100Horas

Maíra Streit

SINTRA — The large and curious eyes of Gurnaaz Kaur reveal her desire to understand the world.

This four-year-old Indian girl doesn’t speak Portuguese yet. A few months have passed since she left her country on the family adventure across the European continent. She uses a few gestures to try to express herself and greets people with a “bom dia” (good morning), one of the few expressions he has learned.

Nahary Conniott, 8, is also looking for ways to interact. From Angola and on the autism spectrum disorder, she has already experienced difficult situations and was asked to leave the private school she attended. In the other schools in which the mother enrolled her, the refusal was always justified by the lack of vacancies.

Children with such different paths found the support they deserved in the Colo100Horas project. Started in 2021, it is a self-organized network of women who came together to help immigrants with their immense daily challenges in Sintra, in western Portugal.

The long list of problems meant they banded together to look for a solution: the strenuous routine of caring for children (still imposed in most homes as the responsibility of women), low salaries, the overcrowding of daycare centers, excessive work and the difficulty with shift schedules, which is common in jobs in the catering and cleaning industries.

A tragic case that occurred recently in the neighborhood that drew attention to the need for greater support for families: a six-year-old boy died after falling from the ninth floor of the building where he lived. He was at home with only his two little brothers, while his mother had left to go to the market, a few meters away.

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