When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Geopolitics

Carla Bruni-Sarkozy's New Public Face -- And Pregnancy Rumors

The French First Lady appears to be gearing up for Nicolas Sarkozy's reelection bid next year by talking more in public. But she won't confirm or deny whether a First Baby is on the way.

Carla Bruni-Sarkozy's New Public Face -- And Pregnancy Rumors
Cécile Cornudet

PARIS - One year before the 2012 presidential election, Carla Bruni-Sarkozy has broken three years of a nearly complete public silence since becoming France's First Lady. With a quick succession of well-orchestrated public appearances -- including an interview with Paris Match magazine, a meeting with readers of the Le Parisien daily and a press conference expected on May 17 about her Carla Bruni-Sarkozy Foundation that fights against illiteracy -- has suddenly taken on a more political role.

"I am ultra-Sarkozyist," she was quoted as saying by Le Parisien. "I believe in him. I am no longer left-wing at all", adding that "two terms would be good." But showing restraint and preserving secrecy are still the guiding principles for the First Lady, who has opted for discretion since marrying Sarkozy in Feb. 2008, a year after he was elected and just months after his second divorce.

President Sarkozy has recently also kept a lower public profile in an effort to regain popularity ahead of his reelection bid next year. Carla Bruni-Sarkozy does not exclude the possibility of taking part in the 2012 campaign, but offers a caveat. "I can join him on the campaign trail, listen to what people want to say, help those who ask me, ... accompany him to meetings', she suggests in an interview with Le Parisien. But at the same time, she admits that she does not know "how an election campaign functions."

Most of the time, she speaks to emphasize her husband's personal qualities, countering standing French criticisms of Sarkozy. "He is not nervous, he is full of life," she says. "He has become calmer and wiser." She also echos the mantra that Sarkozy is a president only concerned with implementing reforms for the good of France. "If my husband wants to run for re-election and the French people don't want him anymore, he will go quietly, honored to have served his country, to have worked very hard and done all he could," she said.

That is a good argument to justify why her lips are sealed whenever someone inquires about the pregnancy rumors. If she does not talk about it, it is not only because of medical precaution, but because she wants "to protect all the work Sarkozy does."

"I would love to talk about it, but then that takes up the entire space," she said. "But it is my husband's job that magnifies things 100,000 times and turns a kind of small fish into a whale."

When she is asked "So we will know in six months?" she says "Yes." Her answer shows that in the near future, the Elysée Palace will comment on that matter as little as possible. An Elysée adviser hopes that in the end, the view of a President who leads the simplest and most reasonable life possible" will maybe come up.

Read the original article in French

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Economy

Europe's Winter Energy Crisis Has Already Begun

in the face of Russia's stranglehold over supplies, the European Commission has proposed support packages and price caps. But across Europe, fears about the cost of living are spreading – and with it, doubts about support for Ukraine.

Protesters on Thursday in the German state of Thuringia carried Russian flags and signs: 'First our country! Life must be affordable.'

Martin Schutt/dpa via ZUMA
Stefanie Bolzen, Philipp Fritz, Virginia Kirst, Martina Meister, Mandoline Rutkowski, Stefan Schocher, Claus, Christian Malzahn and Nikolaus Doll

-Analysis-

In her State of the Union address on September 14, European Commission chief Ursula von der Leyen, issued an urgent appeal for solidarity between EU member states in tackling the energy crisis, and towards Ukraine. Von der Leyen need only look out her window to see that tensions are growing in capital cities across Europe due to the sharp rise in energy prices.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

In the Czech Republic, people are already taking to the streets, while opposition politicians elsewhere are looking to score points — and some countries' support for Ukraine may start to buckle.

With winter approaching, Europe is facing a true test of both its mettle, and imagination.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ