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EFE (Spain), BBC (UK), AP

Worldcrunch

A thousand people were evacuated Sunday night in La Gomera, in Spain's Canary Islands, as forest fires continue.

Two boats transported residents from the Valle Gran Rey area to the town of San Sebastian overnight, after the fire blocked off road access, the BBC reported.

The Garajonay nature reserve, a Unesco World heritage site, has also been badly affected.

The fires have forced 5,000 people in total to flee their homes since Friday.

Casimimo Curbelo, a local government official told AP: "We are living through hell. We have asked the central government for more resources with which to fight the fire."

This tweet from a Spanish journalist shows her anger that no State official has come to the island to offer support to the island's citizens:

Hoy he comprendido qué es el Estado de las Autonomías: que La Gomera arda desde hace una semana y no aparezca ni un dirigente nacional.

— Carmela Ríos (@CarmelaRios) August 11, 2012

Now I understand the system of autonomies: La Gomera has been burning for a week and not one national leader has turned up.

An unusually dry winter followed by soaring temperatures in recent weeks is reported to be the cause of the fire.

A fire is also ablaze, although on a smaller scale, in nearby Tenerife, which attracts thousands of tourists in the summer months.

On the mainland, a forest fire in Alicante has claimed the lives of two firefighters over the weekend, EFE reported.

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Society

Papá, Papá, On Repeat: Are We Men Ready For Fatherhood To Change Our Lives?

There is a moment on Saturday or Sunday, after having spent ten hours with my kids, that I get a little exasperated, I lose my patience. I find it hard to identify the emotion, I definitely feel some guilt too. I know that time alone with them improves our relationship... but I get bored! Yes, I feel bored. I want some time in the car for them to talk to each other while I can talk about the stupid things we adults talk about.

A baby builds stack of blocks

Ignacio Pereyra*

This is what a friend tells me. He tends to spend several weekends alone with his two children and prefers to make plans with other people instead of being alone with them. As I listened to him, I immediately remembered my long days with Lorenzo, my son, now three-and-a-half years old. I thought especially of the first two-and-a-half years of his life, when he hardly went to daycare (thanks, COVID!) and we’d spend the whole day together.

It also reminded me of a question I often ask myself in moments of boredom — which I had virtually ignored in my life before becoming a father: how willing are we men to let fatherhood change our lives?

It is clear that the routines and habits of a couple change completely when they have children, although we also know that this rarely happens equally.

With the arrival of a child, men continue to work as much or more than before, while women face a different reality: either they double their working day — maintaining a paid job but adding household and care tasks — or they are forced to abandon all or part of their paid work to devote themselves to caregiving.

In other words, "the arrival of a child tends to strengthen the role of economic provider in men (...), while women reinforce their role as caregivers," says an extensive Equimundo report on Latin America and the Caribbean, highlighting a trend that repeats itself in most Western countries.

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