When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Enjoy unlimited access to quality journalism.

Limited time offer

Get your 30-day free trial!

EFE; CLARIN (Argentina); LA TERCERA (Chile); EL UNIVERSAL, TELESUR (Venezuela)

Worldcrunch

CARACAS - Campaigns have officially closed in Venezuela ahead of Sunday’s election showdown between the heir to Hugo Chavez’s legacy, Nicolas Maduro and opposition leader Henrique Capriles.

Just five months after reelecting Chavez, the country is being called back to the polls following the death of El Comandante in March. Protests sprung up across the oil rich country during the final week of campaigning, which was required to halt by end of day on Thursday, reports Chilean daily La Tercera.

Polls predict a comfortable win for Maduro, who played to the lingering memories of Chavez, and called upon some famous faces for some last-minute campaigning, including Argentinian soccer superstar, Diego Maradona, writes Clarin.

Capriles was defeated in the October 2012 election against Chavez by some 10%. According to El Universal, Maduro sent a warning to his opponent on Thursday night, saying that should Capriles dare to ignore the results of the election, he will have the same fate as an ex-President who is now in exile in Colombia. “Now he’s toying with the idea of a coup,” Maduro said of his opponent during a visit to pay homage to Chavez.

In terms of electoral promises, writes TeleSur, Maduro declared that he will fulfill Chavez’s legacy, and “rebuild the spiritual fabric of the country.”

Meanwhile, Capriles is the change candidate, says EFE. “On Monday there will be a new Venezuela. On Monday we will embrace the future, one of hope,” said Capriles, who reminded the people during his campaign that Maduro is not Chavez.

This election has generated some rising tension both in Venezuela, and surrounding countries. With its flow of oil revenue, Caracas aids its neighbors financially and after 14 years of chavismo, this could lead to a social breakdown in the region.

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

China

How China's Mass Protest Took The World By Surprise — And Where It Will End

China is facing its biggest political protests in decades as frustration grows with its harsh Zero-COVID strategy. However, the real reasons for the protests run much deeper. Could it be the starting point for a new civic movement?

Photo of police during protests in China against covid-19 restrictions

Security measures during a protest against COVID-19 restrictions

Changren Zheng

In just one weekend, protests spread across China. A fire in an apartment block in Urumqi in China’s western Xinjiang region killed 10, with many blaming lockdown rules for the deaths. Anti-lockdown demonstrations spread to Beijing, Shanghai, Wuhan, Chengdu and other cities. University students from more than half of China's provinces organized various protests against COVID restrictions.

Why and how did the movement spread so rapidly?

At the core, protesters are unhappy with President Xi Jinping's three-year-long Zero-COVID strategy that has meant mass testing, harsh lockdowns, and digital tracking. Yet, the general belief about the Chinese people was that they lacked the awareness and experience for mass political action. Even though discontent had been growing about the Zero-COVID strategy, no one expected these protests.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest