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THE IRRAWADDY (Burma)

NAYPYIDAW – The Burmese government is planning to free all political prisoners by July, reports The Irrawaddy.

As opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi was in Oslo receiving the Nobel Prize she was awarded in 1991, Industry Minister Soe Thane, not to be outshined, announced that President Thein Sein had decided to release all political prisoners by the end of July. Thein Sein is "committed to democracy like Nobel Laureate Suu Kyi," said Soe Thane.

The Minister stated that no violent criminals would be freed, something that Mye Aye, leader of the pro-democracy movement 88 Students Generation considers to be "controversial." The activist, a former political prisoner, told The Irrawady that "There is a gray area between political prisoners and violent criminals."

According to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners (AAPP), there are currently 471 political prisoners and 465 more whose whereabouts have not yet been verified.

The unconditional release of all political prisoners was one of the benchmarks set by the E.U. for the lifting on economic sanctions on Burma.

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Person working from home

Bertrand Hauger, Anne-Sophie Goninet, Laure Gautherin and Emma Albright

The world of work is at a crossroads. A new French study published last week shows that in the span of four years, jobs offering remote work have increased tenfold since 2017, as the world grapples with the long-term impact of COVID-19. The profound questioning of the necessity to “go to the office” that the pandemic posed led to teleworking becoming a “new normal” of sorts, with the majority of businesses implementing hybrid models that allow employees to work remotely while still having access to the necessary resources they need to do their jobs ...

… that is, until it was "back to business as usual." But returning to office-based work, as most parts of the world consider the coronavirus crisis more or less a thing of the past, it is becoming apparent to some that things would, and should, never be the same.

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