When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Geopolitics

Breakaway Mali Islamist Miliant Group Calls For Peace Talks

AFP, FRANCE 24 (France), REUTERS

Worldcrunch

BAMAKO- Two weeks after the start of the French military intervention in Mali, the Ansar Dine Islamist militant group has split into two, with the dissident faction calling for peace negotiations.

The dissident group is calling itself the Islamic Movement of Azawad (MIA) according to France 24.

In a statement, the MIA said they "rejected all forms of extremism and terrorism and was committed to fighting them," adding that it wanted a "peaceful solution" to the Mali crisis, reports the AFP.

The statement said the newly formed group was composed entirely of Malian nationals and called on Mali and France to cease hostilities in the zones it was occupying in the northeastern regions of Kidal and Menaka "to create a climate of peace which will pave the way for an inclusive political dialogue".

It is not clear how many fighters have left the Ansar Dine rebels to join MIA, however, France 24 reports that Alghabass Ag Intallah, a senior member of the Ansar Dine who helped seize Mali last year from government forces, is the leader of the new group.

According to the AFP, French planes destroyed two Islamist bases in northern Mali overnight, as well as their fuel stock and armory. More than 2,000 soldiers from Chad and 500 troops from Niger are being deployed in Niger near the Mali border, to open a second front against the Islamists as part of a 6-000 strong African force to boost – and eventually take over – the French intervention.

Most of the African troops for the UN-mandated intervention come from member countries of the West African regional grouping ECOWAS, such as Benin, Nigeria, Senegal, Togo and Niger, according to Reuters. There are also troops from neighboring Burkina Faso as well as Burundi and Chad.

News of the French and African advances has been overshadowed by allegations that Malian government soldiers have executed Tuaregs and Arabs accused of collaborating with the rebels, reports Reuters. International observers are worried that this could trigger an ethnic bloodbath.

[rebelmouse-image 27086189 alt="""" original_size="320x160" expand=1]

Map Vardion via Wikipedia

[rebelmouse-image 27086190 alt="""" original_size="360x355" expand=1]

Map Acntx via Wikipedia

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Geopolitics

The Trumpian Virus Undermining Democracy Is Now Spreading Through South America

Taking inspiration from events in the United States over the past four years, rejection of election results and established state institutions is on the rise in Latin America.

Two supporters of far-right Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro dressed in Brazilian flags during a demonstration in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Bolsonaro supporters dressed in national colours with flags in a demonstration in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, on November 4, 2022.

Ivan Abreu / ZUMA
Carlos Ruckauf*

-Analysis-

BUENOS AIRES — South Africa's Nelson Mandela used to say it was "so easy to break down and destroy. The heroes are those who make peace and build."

Intolerance toward those who think differently, even inside the same political space, is corroding the bases of representative democracy, which is the only system we know that allows us to live and grow in freedom, in spite of its flaws.

Recent events in South America and elsewhere are precisely alerting us to that danger. The most explosive example was in Brazil, where a crowd of thousands managed to storm key institutional premises like the presidential palace, parliament and the Supreme Court.

In Peru, the country's Marxist (now former) president, Pedro Castillo, sought to use the armed and security forces to shut down parliament and halt the Supreme Court and state prosecutors from investigating corruption allegations against him.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest