CNN (USA), BBC NEWS, THE DAILY TELEGRAPH (UK)

Worldcrunch

BEIJING - Gu Kailai, the wife of recently deposed top official in the Chinese Communist Party Bo Xilai, raised no objections to the prosecution's charges as the trial ended on Thursday, reports BBC news.

A court official told reporters Gu did not contest the charges. The date of the verdict will be announced later, the official said.

Gu Kailai is accused of poisoning British expat Neil Heywood in 2011 in Chongqing, where her husband Bo Xilai was head of the Communist party and a very popular figure.

At the time, the death was recorded as a heart attack. But four months later Bo's right-hand man, police chief Wang Lijun, fled to a U.S. consulate, where he alleged murder and a massive cover-up, reports CNN.

Heywood is said to have been a business associate and a close friend to the Bo family. Gu's husband was destined to join the elite committee of leaders at the top of China's ruling part, reports BBC News. He was sacked in March and is currently under investigation for unspecified "disciplinary violations.”

The defendants haven't seen their relatives since they were arrested in early April, reports CNN. Bo Gagua, 24, a Harvard University graduate, said he submitted a witness statement to the defense team for his mother in an email on Tuesday.

According to the Daily Telegraph, security was tight around the courthouse and international media were not allowed into the court.

The two defendants face a possible death penalty if found guilty.

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Society

Germany's Legendary Clubbing Culture Crashes Museum Space

The exhibition “Electro” in Düsseldorf is an unlikely tribute to a joyful and uninhibited club culture, with curators forced to contend with limits of a museum setting ... and another COVID lockdown.

A woman with a "Techno" tattoo in front of the famous Berghain

Boris Pofalla

DÜSSELDORF — The last party at the Berghain nightclub in Berlin lasted from Saturday evening until Monday morning. On the first weekend of December, some clubbers lined up for nine hours outside the former power plant – and still didn’t make it past the doormen. A friend said that dancing in the most famous techno club in the world on its last evening was like landing a spot in the last lifeboat to leave the sinking Titanic on 14 April 1912.

It is surely a coincidence that the first comprehensive exhibition charting the 100-year history of electronic music in Germany opened in the same week that nightclubs across the country were forced to close. It wasn’t planned that way, but it’s like opening an exhibition about the cultural history of alcohol the day after the introduction of prohibition.

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