When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Language tests begin after new Italian law requiring "proof of integration."

Immigrants in Rome (Gianni Dominici)

MILAN - Italy has introduced a language test for all immigrants seeking a long-term residency permit, questioning the candidates on their knowledge of a few hundred every-day words.

A group of 170 immigrants in Florence and another 10 in the northern town of Asti will be the first to be tested. Over the past decade, immigration has become a major demographic force in Italian life, with some four million foreigners in a country of nearly 60 million.

Massimo Arcangeli, the director of a language institute who helped draft the exam, said the immigrants will have to know Italian "at a level a little above survival" to pass. The test has been drafted in collaboration with the universities of Siena and Perugia, both of which have longstanding courses for foreigners.

"We are talking about a limited number of words, about 200 or 300, all somehow relating to everyday life," Arcangeli said. Knowledge of philosophical or political speak will not be necessary, but the immigrants will be required to know terms related to family, work and how to make purchases and function at a simple level.

Candidates will have to listen to brief spoken sentences and then answer questions showing they have understood. They will also have to write answers related to a brief text and compose their own small text, the equivalent of an email to an employer.

Rome introduced the procedure after a European Union directive allowed member states to request "proof of integration" from immigrants seeking an open-ended permit. Italy passed the measure in June.

Read the original article in Italian

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!

Celebrating Ukraine's Independence Day in Rome.

Irene Caselli

September 23-24

  • Burning hijabs in Iran
  • Elizabeth II’s life in magazine covers
  • One big “flying” sea turtle
  • … and much more.
Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ