When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Geopolitics

Australia Launches Child Abuse Investigation, Catholic Church Admits "Shame"

REUTERS, THE AUSTRALIAN, THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD (Australia)

Worldcrunch

SYDNEY – Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard has called for a Royal Commission, the highest form of investigation in the country, into the hundreds of child abuse cases within the country's institutions, including abuses and cover-ups by the Catholic Church.

Gillard sais she wants the commission to take as long as it needs: "I don't want some artificial sense of deadlines to impede what could be good work that we want done," meaning that the inquiry could run for several years.

The Catholic Church has reacted to the decision by saying that a royal commission was a chance to clear doubts about the church, and has defended its internal processes of dealing with abuse allegations, The Australian reports.

Cardinal George Pell, the head of Australia’s powerful Catholic Church acknowledged the “shame” of child sex abuse among the clergy – although he warned that the extent of the problem within his church had been exaggerated, according to Reuters.

"We acknowledge, with shame, the extent of the problem and I want to assure you that we have been serious in attempting to eradicate it and deal with it," Pell told the Sydney Morning Herald.

The scope of the commission is expected to move beyond the Catholic Church and target all institutions, including religious institutions, charities, schools and groups such as scouts and sporting clubs.

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

eyes on the U.S.

Eyes On U.S. – American Diplomacy Is Unable (Or Unwilling) To Adapt To A New World

Crises worldwide mean we need less nationalism and more cooperation, but the U.S., a weakened superpower, won't accept its diminished status.

Close up photo of a somber-looking flag of the U.S.

America the not-so-Great anymore

Juan Gabriel Tokatlian, Ginevra Falconi, Renate Mattar

-Analysis-

BUENOS AIRES — There is widespread international consensus that the post-Cold War period, which began around 1990, is over. Initially, it heralded a "new order" under the guidance of the United States, which promised stability, justice and equity but became instead a run of crises, challenges, conflicts and failures.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest