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SÜDDEUTSCHE ZEITUNG, DPA, DAPD, HGN, WOJA (Germany)

Worldcrunch

ATHENS - Some 7,000 police, including reinforcements brought in from across Greece, will be ensuring extra-tight security during German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s first visit to Athens since the breakout of the financial crisis.

The government fears the visit on Tuesday could unleash hostility from citizens who hold the Chancellor responsible for the harsh austerity measures their country faces.

In addition to the parliament building and Syntagma Square in central Athens, the German Embassy and Goethe Institute will receive special protection, as will the airport and the hotel where Merkel is based for the six-hour visit.

Greece’s two largest unions have announced a three-hour strike and large demonstration in downtown Athens. The Communists and largest opposition party Syriza have also called for demonstrations. The right-wing, anti-austerity party Independent Greeks intends to demonstrate in front of the Germany Embassy.

Chancellor Merkel’s visit takes place as Prime Minister Antonis Samaras’s government negotiates 31.5 billion euros worth of further aid for Greece -- which is on the brink of bankruptcy -- with the EU, International Monetary Fund and European Central Bank.

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Ideas

How Turkey Can Bring Its Brain Drain Back Home

Turkey heads to the polls next year as it faces its worst economic crisis in decades. Disillusioned by corruption, many young people have already left. However, Turkey's disaffected young expats are still very attached to their country, and could offer the best hope for a new future for the country.

Photo of people on a passenger ferry on the Bosphorus, with Istanbul in the background

Leaving Istanbul?

Bekir Ağırdır*

-Analysis-

ISTANBUL — Turkey goes to the polls next June in crucial national elections. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is up against several serious challenges, as a dissatisfied electorate faces the worst economic crisis of his two-decade rule. The opposition is polling well, but the traditional media landscape is in the hands of the government and its supporters.

But against this backdrop, many, especially the young, are disillusioned with the country and its entire political system.

Young or old, people from every demographic, cultural group and class who worry about the future of Turkey are looking for something new. Relationships and dialogues between people from different political traditions and backgrounds are increasing. We all constantly feel the country's declining quality of life and worry about the prevalence of crime and lawlessness.

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