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BBC NEWS (United Kingdom), PAJHWOK (Afghanistan)

PUL-I-KHUMRI – A dramatic landslide killed at least 80 people in the northern Afghan province of Baghlan.

The landslide was the result of two successive earthquakes that were felt as far as Kabul, 105 miles away. "A quake measuring 5.4 struck the Hindu Kush region, followed by a 5.7 aftershock that jolted central, northern and northwestern Afghanistan," Afghan news agency Pajhwok reports. The landslide caused part of a mountain to collapse, completeley burying the remote village.

Baghlan Provincial Council Member Haji Wakil told BBC News that "the mountain was too big and strong and the houses were made of mud ... There is silence and silence alone."

The UN is helping local authorities and bulldozers are already at work to recover bodies. Out of 23 houses, only one is still standing and there is little hope of finding survivors. "In 2002, an earthquake in the same province killed more than 2,000 people," says the BBC.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Searching For Marianna, A Pregnant Doctor From Mariupol Held Captive By The Russians

We’ve heard about the plight of the soldiers-turned-prisoners from Mariupol. Here are some traces of the disturbing fate of a young female doctor who’s been taken away.

A paper dove reads "Mariupol" at a shelter for displaced children in Uzhhorod, western Ukraine.

Paweł Smoleński

"Wait for me, because I will return…"

Marianna Mamonova wrote these words to her family, among the text messages and short phone calls that are the only remaining fragments used to piece together her recent past. We also have a photo of her, posted on Russian websites, where she looks into the lens, gaunt and exhausted, signed with a number like a concentration camp prisoner.

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Until the Russian-Ukrainian war, Mamonova’s biography was available to anyone who wanted to know. She was born in 1991, studied at the Ternopil Medical University, and later at the Kyiv Military Academy. After completing her studies, she was sent to work in the coastal city of Berdiansk. Her mother says that this is where her daughter's dream came true: She’d always wanted to be a military doctor, and worked in Berdiansk for three years, receiving the rank of officer in the Ukrainian army.

Beginning in 2014, she’d worked stints as a front-line doctor in the Donbas region, and when Russia invaded Ukraine in February she went to war again. This time in Mariupol.

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Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

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