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CNN (USA), BBC NEWS (UK), EL NACIONAL (Venezuela)

Worldcrunch

CARACAS - Venezuela prison minister Iris Varela has confirmed that at least 20 people were killed after violence broke out in a Venezuelan jail, reports El Nacional.

The violence occurred between rival gangs, with one of the dead a relative of an inmate, in Yare prison, south of Caracas, BBC News reports. The situation is now under control according to Iris Varela.

"There was a confrontation between two heavily armed groups inside the prison," Varela said.

Officials blame inmates for trying to take over the prison, says CNN.

The prison is located in the northern state of Miranda, where at least 25 people died in a riot in another prison last year.

According to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, protests and violent clashes between rival gangs in Venezuela's overcrowded prisons led to more than 500 deaths last year, reports BBC News.

Last month, similar waves of violence erupted in the Cepri penitentiary and lasted over 20 days.

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Society

Now They're Diagnosing Burnout's Never-Quit Cousin: Burn-On

Feeling overworked but not yet burned out? Often the problem is “burn-on,” an under-researched phenomenon whose sufferers desperately struggle to keep up and meet their own expectations — with dangerous consequences for their health.

Now They're Diagnosing Burnout's Never-Quit Cousin: Burn-On

Burn-out is the result of sustained periods of stress at work

Beate Strobel

At first glance, Mr L seems to be a successful man with a well-rounded life: middle management, happily married, father of two. If you ask him how he is, he responds with a smile and a “Fine thanks”. But everything is not fine. When he was admitted to the psychosomatic clinic Kloster Diessen, Mr L described his emotional life as hollow and empty.

Although outwardly he is still putting on a good face, he has been privately struggling for some time. Everything that used to bring him joy and fun has become simply another chore. He can hardly remember what it feels like to enjoy his life.

For psychotherapist Professor Bert te Wildt, who heads the psychosomatic clinic in Ammersee in Bavaria, Germany, the symptoms of Patient L. make him a prime example of a new and so far under-researched syndrome, that he calls “burn-on”. Working with psychologist Timo Schiele, he has published his findings about the phenomenon in a book, Burn-On.

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