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LA NACION, BUENOS AIRES HERALD (Argentina), BBC NEWS (UK)

Worldcrunch

BUENOS AIRES - Tens of thousands of people have taken to the streets of Argentina's capital -- and other cities in the country and around the world -- in a coordinated protest against the government of Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, reports La Nacion.

The massive march in Buenos Aires was the largest in a series of "cacerolazos," protests named for the cooking pots that participants hit to draw attention to problems including crime rates, inflation and political corruption, writes BBC News.

People gathered at the Obelisk, the crossroads of Rivadavia and Acoyte, Santa Fe and Callao and many towns in the greater Buenos Aires.

Similar protests took place in Argentina's major cities as well as in Sydney, New York, Paris and Miami where there are significant Argentine communities, reports the Buenos Aires Herald.

Protesters also voiced their objections to restrictions introduced last year, and further sharpened this year, on the purchase of dollars.

Official figures say inflation is at 12%, but analysts say it is probably much higher.

In September, the International Monetary Fund warned Argentina of sanctions and gave the country three months to provide more reliable estimates.

The government has avoided directly acknowledging the protests but Kirchner's official Facebook page noted Thursday morning that Argentina is a democracy where people are free to express their opinions and speak their mind:

President Fernandez was re-elected by a landslide to a second term in 2011, after taking over her husband in 2007.

Her approval ratings have since dropped and anger towards her policies has grown in the country.

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Ideas

How U.S. Airlines Are Doing Cuba's Dirty Work On American Soil

American and Southwest Airlines have been refusing to allow Cubans on board flights if they've been blacklisted by the government in Havana.

How U.S. Airlines Are Doing Cuba's Dirty Work On American Soil

Boarding a plane in Camaguey, Cuba

Santiago Villa

On Sunday, American Airlines refused to let Cuban writer Carlos Manuel Álvarez board a Miami flight bound for Havana. It was at least the third time this year that a U.S. airline refused to let Cubans on board to return to their homeland after Havana circulated a government "blacklist" of critics of the regime. Clearly undemocratic and possibly illegal under U.S. law, the airlines want to make sure to cash in on a lucrative travel route, writes Colombian journalist Santiago Villa:

-OpEd-

Imagine for a moment that you left your home country years ago because you couldn't properly pursue your chosen career there. It wasn't easy, of course: Your profession is not just singularly demanding, but even at the top of the game you might not be assured a stable or sufficient income, and you've had to take on second jobs, working in bars and restaurants.

This chosen vocation is that of a writer or journalist, or perhaps an artist, which has kept you tied to your homeland, often the subject of your work, even if you don't live there anymore.

Since leaving, you've been back home several times, though not so much for work. Because if you did, you would be followed in cars and receive phone calls to let you know you are being watched.

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