When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Geopolitics

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing
Kristen Gillespie



A R A B I C A
ارابيكا

JORDAN: ROUGH POLITICS
In Jordan's Lower House of Parliament, largely wedded to the status quo, Prime Minister Marouf al-Bakhit barely managed to win a 53-50 vote of confidence following accusations of involvement in a murky casino deal involving King Abdullah's closest advisers and confidantes. The representatives already voted to indict former Tourism Minister Osama Dabbas on corruption charges. But in an extraordinary act for Jordanian politics, Dabbas returned this week to the small city of Salt, the heart of his tribal support base, and promptly blamed senior officials for the scandal at an open press conference. Dabbas said he refused to serve as a scapegoat for the aborted casino-construction project, blaming the head of the intelligence agency and a former confidante to the king for orchestrating the deal.

BAHRAIN: TICKET HOME
Moheet.com quotes official sources as saying that the 1,000 Saudi soldiers currently guarding key government buildings in Bahrain will begin withdrawing next week. Soldiers from the UAE and Saudi Arabia arrived in Bahrain in March to help quell the insurrection there against the ruling Al Khalifa family.

EGYPT: DINOSAUR TWEETS
Wael Ghonim tweets about government officials: "Government dinosaurs: Old, thinking little, making many mistakes, moving slowly, devoid of vision, weak of hearing and severely damaging anyone around them."

TUNISIAN MIND
Al Jazeera features a question-and-answer interview with Tunisian writer Habib al-Salaami, who just published "The women of al-Bustan" in Arabic, a story of a modest family living in the Tunisian capital. On Tunisia , al-Salaami says that "society is the result of ambivalence and acceptance of the control of what some would call extremist religious thought." Add to that the layer of repression exercised by deposed President Ben Ali for decades "who rulsed Tunisia based on fear. And this has impacted the behavior of the Tunisian, who doesn't feel safe with anyone and resorts to deceit, lying and hypocrisy to protect himself."

ARAB SOUL
Al-Salaami says that other, larger themes unite the Arab world: Swinging between "past and present, between tradition and modernity, between tradition that still has a strong presence in the patterns of our thinking and the desire for modernization."

June 28, 2011

photo credit: illustir

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Geopolitics

Utter Pessimism, What Israelis And Palestinians Share In Common

Right now, according to a joint survey of Israelis and Palestinians, hopes for a peaceful solution of coexistence simply don't exist. The recent spate of violence is confirmation of the deepest kind of pessimism on both sides for any solution other than domination of the other.

An old Palestinian protester waves Palestinian flag while he confronts the Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the village of Beit Dajan near the West Bank city of Nablus.

A Palestinian protester confronts Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the West Bank village of Beit Dajan on Jan. 6.

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — Just before the latest outbreak of violence between Israelis and Palestinians, a survey of public opinion among the two peoples provided a key to understanding the current situation unfolding before our eyes.

It was a joint study, entitled "Palestinian-Israeli Pulse", carried out by two research centers, one Israeli, the other Palestinian, which for years have been regularly asking the same questions to both sides.

The result is disastrous: not only is the support for the two-state solution — Israel and Palestine side by side — at its lowest point in two decades, but there is now a significant share of opinion on both sides that favors a "non-democratic" solution, i.e., a single state controlled by either the Israelis or Palestinians.

This captures the absolute sense of pessimism commonly felt regarding the chances of the two-state option ever being realized, which currently appears to be our grim reality today. But the results are also an expression of the growing acceptance on both sides that it is inconceivable for either state to live without dominating the other — and therefore impossible to live in peace.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest