When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Enjoy unlimited access to quality journalism.

Limited time offer

Get your 30-day free trial!
ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing
Kristen Gillespie


A R A B I C A
ارابيكا

Syria: Controlling The Message
*A video clip is circulating of two funeral processions in the eastern Syrian desert town of Deir Azour one day after security forces fired on protesters and killed two people, a 16-year-old and 17-year-old boys. The group broke out into chants of "the people want the regime to fall" and "Syria: free, free, free and Bashar: leave, leave, leave."

*Syrian state television, meanwhile, is claiming that 80 police officers were killed "at the hands of armed groups' in the northern town of Jisr al-Shughur. One of the main organizers of the uprising, the Syrian Revolution facebook group, responds: "The official Syrian media is spreading lies so they can go in and massacre unarmed civilians. We hold the regime responsible for every drop of blood spilled."

Saudi Arabia: Controlling Behavior
*Police in the Saudi city of Mecca arrested 43 members of "the third sex," an Arabic euphemism for transvestites, who were having a party in the Islamic holy city. The police, accompanied by the fundamentalist religious police, raided the underground party and will take "special measures' against those they arrested. Officials did not elaborate on the measures.

Egypt: Controlling Assets
*Egyptian officials investigating associates of ex-President Hosni Mubarak found $5 million in a European bank account belonging to former Housing Minister Mohammad Suleiman. Judicial officials also found an apartment in Paris in Suleiman's name. The former minister admitted to possessing the assets, saying he forgot to mention them during an initial round of questioning with authorities.


Egypt: Curfew Lifted
*Egypt announced that on June 15th, it will lift a nighttime curfew that has been in place since January 28th. When the curfew was imposed at the beginning of the revolution, it was in effect from 3pm to 8am. As the security situation improved, the curfew hours were gradually reduced to the current 2am to 5am.

Tunisia: Anyone's Charade
*Tunisia's former dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali says he is tired of being a scapegoat and that his upcoming trial is a "charade."


June 6, 2011

photo credit: illustir

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

photo of Senegal President Macky Sall coming out of his airplane

President of Senegal Macky Sall arrives Monday at Andrews Air Force Base for the U.S.-Africa summit. Md., Dec. 12, 2022.

U.S. Air Force, Airman 1st Class Isabelle Churchill
Alex Hurst

-Analysis-

Some 100 of the most important political eyes in Africa aren’t turned towards the U.S. this week — they’re in the U.S. For the first time in eight years, the White House is hosting 49 African heads of state and leaders of government (and the Senegalese head of the African Union) for a U.S.-Africa summit. Not invited: any nation that has recently undergone a military putsch, or otherwise not in good standing with the African Union, like Mali, Guinea, Burkina Faso, and Sudan.

It’s only the second such summit, after Barack Obama held the inaugural one in 2014. For African nations, it’s a chance to push for trade agreements and international investment, as reports FinancialAfrik, as well as to showcase their most successful businesses. According to RFI, dominant in its coverage of West Africa, on the agenda are: fighting terrorism, climate change, food security, and a financial facility intended to facilitate African exports to the U.S.

These themes are recurrent in national coverage and official diplomatic communiqués, from the likes of Cameroon (whose communiqué pointedly notes the U.S.’s “lack of colonial history” in Africa), which is seeking to regain access to the the U.S. market under the African Growth and Opportunity Act, to Madagascar, which as an island nation, is particularly concerned with climate change.

To receive Eyes on U.S. each week in your inbox, sign up here.

But is the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit and the accompanying nice talk all just cynical cover for what are, in fact, purely U.S. strategic interests in its wider global competition with China? That’s certainly the message from Chinese media — but also a point of view either echoed, or simply acknowledged as matter of fact, by African voices.

“No matter how many fancy words the U.S. uses, the country still sees Africa as an arena to serve its strategic goal of competing with China,” Liu Xin writes for China’s state-run Global Times.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest