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Geopolitics

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing
Kristen Gillespie

A R A B I C A ارابيكا

YEMENI ATTACK
*As Yemeni state television aired a photo montage of President Ali Abdullah Saleh accompanied by background music, the crawl beneath reads: "President Saleh, may God protect him, is in good health and reports of his death are untrue." Al Arabiya and other news outlets reported that Saleh had sustained a minor injury to the back of his head during an attack on the presidential compound on Friday. A source in Saleh's ruling party, the General People's Congress, told the network that Saleh escaped an assassination attempt, accusing the opposition and tribesmen loyal to Sadiq al-Ahmar of orchestrating the shooting.

*At least three people were killed on the attack on the presidential compound in Sanaa, including the mosque imam who was leading the prayers for Saleh and other senior officials when the shells hit.

SYRIAN SLAUGHTER
BBC Arabic reports that 34 people were killed during Friday protests in the conservative city of Hama, where President Bashar Assad's father killed up to 20,000 people during an Islamist uprising in 1982. In the accompanying video report, protesters chant, "the Syrian people are one. One, one, one." In another clip, protesters (including small children) walk through the streets chanting, "the people want the regime to fall."

*Internet service was cut in most of the country. But Al Jazeera interviewed an eyewitness in Hama, who breaks down while recounting that dozens of people were killed when Syrian security forces opened fire on the crowds. Why Hama when protests unfolded around the country, the interviews asks. "I don't know, but probably because of the enormous size of the protest in Hama." The eyewitness said at up to 60 people, including children, were killed by live bullets. "It was deliberate, targeted killing," he says.

EGYPTIAN WAGES
*Egypt's Finance Minister Samir Radwan announced that the minimum wage for public-sector employees will go up to $117 per month. The wage hike is a key grievance of protesters who maintain that the current $67 doesn't come close to keeping up with the cost of living. But the higher wage doesn't apply to the private sector, where most of the workforce is employed. The minimum wage struggle is a hot-button issue in Egypt, where it remained at its 1984 rate of $5.89 per month until last November.

EGYPTIAN ARMY
*Also in Egypt, Field Marshal Hussein Tantawi, the head of the military council ruling the country, said certain unnamed "paid elements' are seeking to "drive a wedge between the people and the army." Tantawi also acknowledged divisions within the armed forces, and said they would be resolved. He pledged that the armed forces would continue to serve as "a protective shield" for Egypt.


June 3, 2011

photo credit: illustir

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Society

In Mexico, Influencers Make Castoff Clothing Cool

Young consumers around the world increasingly seek out secondhand and alternative clothing markets — making Mexico City’s flea markets, or tianguis, suddenly and surprisingly popular.

In Mexico, Influencers Make Castoff Clothing Cool

Moisés Molina, 21, sifts through garments for sale at a stall at tianguis de Las Torres, ineastern Mexico City

Aline Suárez del Real Islas and Mar García

MEXICO CITY — The shouts of vendors mingle at the hodgepodge of stalls selling food, fruit and household items at the tianguis Las Torres, a flea market in eastern Mexico City. Beneath the tents, heaps of clothing are mounded on containers, planks and tubes. People examine garment after garment, holding them up to judge their size and draping their choices over their forearms and shoulders. The vendors watch from above, yelling prices and watching for occasional theft.

Bale clothing, or secondhand clothes, often called “ropa americana” (American clothing) here, is widely available at stalls in the open-air markets, or tianguis, of Mexico City and the State of Mexico. These garments, often illegally smuggled from the United States, used to be an affordable apparel option for Mexican families.

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