ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing

The lead story in Al-Shams newspaper, the official daily of the Libyan Information Ministry: "The Brother Leader of the Libyan Revolution welcomed young members of the Zintan living in Tripoli.

A R A B I C A ارابيكا

By Kristen Gillespie

REGIME DAILY SCOOP

*The lead story in Al-Shams newspaper, the official daily of the Libyan Information Ministry: "The Brother Leader of the Libyan Revolution welcomed young members of the Zintan living in Tripoli. During this meeting the young people expressed their solidarity with the Brother Leader and their commitment to the protection of the law and the protection of the Great Revolution. They confirmed their willingness to defeat the enemies' and traitors' conspiracy, whose accomplices are seeking a return of colonialism which was undone by the Revolution along with the destabilization of security and safety of the Libyan people.

FACEBOOKED

*A Saudi facebook group is calling for a "day of rage" in the kingdom on Friday despite government warnings that no public rallies will be tolerated. The group has more than 33,000 members and begins to describe itself with the cry heard around the Arab world, "the people want the regime to fall." Group administrators posted a list of bullet points that includes direct elections, "a fully independent judiciary," "freedom of expression and assembly," "the lifting of restrictions on women" and "the abolitions of special privileges and immunity for anyone."

BUTTER, NOT GUNS

*On the heels of King Mohamed VI's announcement of political reforms, Moroccan paper Al Alam reports that the government announced it would create 3 million jobs in the next decade. The move follows a demand by the General Union of Moroccan Enterprises. The government expressed its "full readiness' to implement the union's proposal to create employment, a proposal which will presumably keep union members off the streets…for now.


LIBYAN LIFTING

* Syrian-Brazilian doctor Fabio Nakkash spoke to Al Arabiya by phone about his trip in 1994 to Libya to perform a hair-implant surgery on Muammar Gaddafi at his compound in the southern suburbs of Tripoli. Nakkash got the opportunity from Dr. Elisar Ribeiro a well-known plastic surgeon from Rio de Janeiro who went with Nakkash to Libya to perform a facelift on a then 55-year-old Gaddafi. "Make me look like a man of 28," Gaddafi told the doctors, insisting that he wanted both procedures done at midnight, without any anesthesia.

March 10, 2011

photo credit: illustir

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