When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing
Kristen Gillespie

A R A B I C A ارابيكا


SIGNS AND SLOGANS

*This Al Jazeera report looks at the importance of signs and slogans in ongoing Arab revolutions. One placard from Benghazi, Libya shows a chess queen knocking the king, with the head of Gaddafi, off the chessboard. It's part of what looks like a warehouse where revolutions are built. At a table in an unidentified part of the newly free Libyan city sit a group of young men on computers. In a different area, signs are being designed and painted by hand. One reads, "The Libyan people reject foreign intervention."

BOOKS AND WOMEN

*In Riyadh on Wednesday evening, a group of conservative members of the Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and Protection from Vice stormed the Riyadh Book Fair, roughing up the women present, taking away the microphone and yelling at women to dress more modestly. The young men who launched the assault were arrested and later released.

VIRTUE OF PATIENCE

*It is scenes like this that finally drove Egyptian Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq, a Mubarak man, to step down. Egyptian blog 3arabawy posted footage of "The women of Tahrir," part of the crowd gathering daily to demand the resignation of Shafiq. One sign reads, "Victory comes with patience." Mass demonstrations to step up the pressure on Shafiq were scheduled for Friday.

VIRTUE OF IMPATIENCE

*Jordanian columnist Mohammed Abu Romman argues that if citizens and the political opposition do not unite now to press for immediate reform, "we will lose the historical moment and go back to square one." The Jordanian government said this week that true reforms are coming, but will take months to implement. Ahmed Hmeid tweeted in response to the article, "let us agree the ball is now in the reformers' court. Will society succeed in building a broad front for reform?"

KICKER TWEET

*A tweet response from Benghazi in reply to a question about the situation there: "Silence is better than an answer."

March 3, 2011

photo credit: illustir

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

Why The 'Perfect Storm' Of Iran's Protests May Be Unstoppable

The latest round of anti-regime protests in Iran is different than other in the 40 years of the Islamic Republic: for its universality and boldness, the level of public fury and grief, and the role of women and social media. The target is not some policy or the economy, but the regime itself.

A woman holds a lock of her hair during a London rally to protest the murder of Mahsa Amini in London

Roshanak Astaraki

-Analysis-

The death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini in Tehran on Sept. 16, after a possible beating at a police station, has sparked outrage and mass protests in Iran and abroad. There have been demonstrations and a violent attempt to suppress them in more than 100 districts in every province of Iran.

These protests may look like others since 2017, and back even to 1999 — yet we may be facing an unprecedented turning point in Iranians' opposition to the Islamic Republic. Indeed newly installed conservative President Ibrahim Raisi could not have expected such momentum when he set off for a quick trip to New York and back for a meeting of the UN General Assembly.

For one of the mistakes of a regime that takes pride in dismissing the national traditions of Iran is to have overlooked the power of grief among our people.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ