ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing

As major media outlets tried piecing together scattered battlefield reports from Libya, and the possibility of a US-led intervention, others were buzzing with satirical and sartorial perspectives….

A R A B I C A ارابيكا

By Kristen Gillespie

LIBYA LITE

As major media outlets tried piecing together scattered battlefield reports from Libya, and the possibility of a US-led intervention, others were buzzing with satirical and sartorial perspectives….

*The inevitable YouTube clip "Hitler Gaddafi" has arrived, with the voice of a Gaddafi rant running over footage of an Adolf Hitler speech. "He is a crazy person," one person commented.

*Al Arabiya posted a feature called "The clothing of Gaddafi: Strange accessories and a variety of designs." The network featured a video montage of Gaddafi's dubious yet often unforgettable duds, including a clip of the Libyan leader from last week looking in the mirror and posing in the moments before a speech. He is seen buttoning and unbuttoning the top of his ensemble and modeling each look. "It would be difficult to separate the Libyan leader from his physical appearance," the article noted. "The changes in his clothes reflect the changes in his ideas."

ARAB UPRISING: JOBS

*The Gulf Cooperation Council is considering a "Marshall Plan" to improve living conditions and job prospects in Bahrain and Oman, Kuwaiti paper Al-Qabas reported, citing "high-level sources." Both countries face high rates of youth unemployment, which has helped spark uprisings against the regimes in other Arabic countries.

ARAB UPRISING: STOCKS

*Recent protests rocking the Gulf states have sent regional stock markets on a downward spiral. The BBC Arabic reported that Saudi Arabia's market touched its lowest point since November 2008 with the headline: "Saudi Arabia's stock market drops amidst fears that protests move to kingdom."

ARAB UPRISING: POWER

*A new Facebook group calls for the creation of a constitutional monarchy in Jordan, which could effectively strip King Abdullah of his ultimate authority over any and all matters of state. The group's mission statement echoes the demands of the street protesters and organized opposition. The formation of a constitutional monarchy will "enable the Jordanian people to recover the sovereignty over their homeland, and so the king shall be head of state…and should be spared day-to-day running of the country." The king's role would be relegated to serving as a "reference, a balance between different powers and a guarantor of security."

KICKER TWEET

*@Randa_Mohammad asks: The Sheikh of Al Azhar Islamic university was handing out fatwas on Libya as if they were handfuls of jasmine, yet where were you, Sheikh, when Egyptians were in Tahrir Square…?"

March 2, 2011

photo credit: illustir

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Future

The Metaverse Will Make All That's Bad With The Internet Worse

The change of Facebook's name to Meta is a hint to the general public of where social media and digital sovereignty risks taking us in a future "virtual" world.

Creating a digital avatar in the metaverse

Raphaël Suire

-OpEd-

PARIS — The first bricks of the internet emerged in post-World War II California at the crossroads of a double ideology: military and libertarian, based on the virtues of decentralization. It was all about inventing a network infrastructure that was resilient to targeted attacks. It also allowed for individuals to be emancipated through a new set of capabilities, including in communication, interaction and learning, facilitated through a microcomputer.

Keep reading... Show less
Keep up with the world. Break out of the bubble.
Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS
MOST READ