When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Geopolitics

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing

The Arab world's eyes and ears continue to strain to better gauge the situation in Libya, where Muammar Gaddafi appears to be using all means at his disposal to hold on to power.

A R A B I C A ارابيكا

By Kristen Gillespie


FUZZY PICTURE

*The Arab world's eyes and ears continue to strain to better gauge the situation in Libya, where Muammar Gaddafi appears to be using all means at his disposal to hold on to power. There are reports of a major assault underway by loyal Gaddafi troops on rebel forces, and the Colonel gave another rambling televised discourse, accusing protesters of serving the interests of Al-Qaeda and trying drugging the coffee and milk of Libyans "to take control of them." Meanwhile, defections from his regime continued, with Libya's ambassador to Jordan announcing his resignation and support for the revolution.

*Lebanon reportedly refused to allow a private plane carrying the wife of Gaddafi's son, Hannibal, among others. Aline Skaf is of Lebanese origin.

Hannibal and Aline were arrested in Switzerland in 2008 for allegedly abusing their servants, sparking a serious diplomatic crisis between Libya and Switzerland.

‘SHOCKING" (IN THE GOOD SENSE) VIDEO

*This YouTube video shows an elongated Egyptian flag connecting a church to a mosque in the port city of Alexandria as people in the streets honk horns, applaud and cheer. Referring to widespread beliefs that the Egyptian government fomented sectarian strife between Muslims and Christians, one commentator wrote, "people in the state intelligence video would have a heart attack if they saw this video."

A QUESTION

*Democracy activist Wael Ghonim reminds his 94,000 Twitter followers about former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's son, Gamal Mubarak, a former adviser to his father who reportedly helped amass those hidden billions of dollars: "Gamal Mubarak is still free although all his friends are being tried or have had their assets frozen… Why?"

VIOLENT CLASH IN JORDAN

*The Jordanian government arrests two people in connection with violence against protesters last Friday; 11 more arrest warrants issued. Another opposition protest is scheduled for this Friday following afternoon prayers.

NON-VIOLENT CLASH IN JORDAN

*Employees of Jordan's state-run newspaper, Al Rai, staged the first sit-in in the paper's history, demanding higher salaries – and journalism standards. Omar Assaf, the former assistant editor who resigned in protest against the paper's editorial policies, said "We tried to reform the paper and make it more professional, but ran into a wall."

Feb. 24, 2011

photo credit: illustir

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Society

In Northern Kenya, Where Climate Change Is Measured In Starving Children

The worst drought in 40 years, which has deepened from the effects of climate change, is hitting the young the hardest around the Horn of Africa. A close-up look at the victims, and attempts to save lives and limit lasting effects on an already fragile region in Kenya.

Photo of five mothers holding their malnourished children

At feeding time, nurses and aides encourage mothers to socialize their children and stimulate them to eat.

Georgina Gustin

KAKUMA — The words "Stabilization Ward" are painted in uneven black letters above the entrance, but everyone in this massive refugee camp in Kakuma, Kenya, calls it ya maziwa: The place of milk.

Rescue workers and doctors, mothers and fathers, have carried hundreds of starving children through the doors of this one-room hospital wing, which is sometimes so crowded that babies and toddlers have to share beds. A pediatric unit is only a few steps away, but malnourished children don’t go there. They need special care, and even that doesn’t always save them.

In an office of the International Rescue Committee nearby, Vincent Opinya sits behind a desk with figures on dry-erase boards and a map of the camp on the walls around him. “We’ve lost 45 children this year due to malnutrition,” he says, juggling emergencies, phone calls, and texts. “We’re seeing a significant increase in malnutrition cases as a result of the drought — the worst we’ve faced in 40 years.”

From January to June, the ward experienced an 800 percent rise in admissions of children under 5 who needed treatment for malnourishment — a surge that aid groups blame mostly on a climate change-fueled drought that has turned the region into a parched barren.

Opinya, the nutrition manager for the IRC here, has had to rattle off these statistics many times, but the reality of the numbers is starting to crack his professional armor. “It’s a very sad situation,” he says, wearily. And he believes it will only get worse. A third year of drought is likely on the way.

More children may die. But millions will survive malnutrition and hunger only to live through a compromised future, researchers say. The longer-term health effects of this drought — weakened immune systems, developmental problems — will persist for a generation or more, with consequences that will cascade into communities and societies for decades.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest